delineation

[dih-lin-ee-ey-shuhn]
noun
1.
the act or process of delineating.
2.
a chart or diagram; sketch; rough draft.
3.
a description.

Origin:
1560–70; < Late Latin dēlīneātiōn- (stem of dēlīneātiō) a sketch, equivalent to Latin dēlīneāt(us) (see delineate) + -iōn- -ion

delineative [dih-lin-ee-ey-tiv, -ee-uh-tiv] , adjective
nondelineation, noun
nondelineative, adjective
predelineation, noun
undelineative, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
delineate (dɪˈlɪnɪˌeɪt)
 
vb
1.  to trace the shape or outline of; sketch
2.  to represent pictorially, as by making a chart or diagram; depict
3.  to portray in words, esp with detail and precision; describe
 
[C16: from Latin dēlīneāre to sketch out, from līnealine1]
 
de'lineable
 
adj
 
deline'ation
 
n
 
de'lineative
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

delineation
1560s, from L. delineationem, noun of action from delineare (see delineate).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Knowledge, it held, went hand in hand with nomenclature and delineation.
But vivid delineation of characters and a compelling plot line are not this
  opera's strong points.
Sketches and studies are usually considered rough outlines or the vague
  delineation of some bigger work without the detail.
He made the phrase, in all its variety, more important than the rigid
  delineation of the bar line.
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