digest

[v. dih-jest, dahy-; n. dahy-jest]
verb (used with object)
1.
to convert (food) in the alimentary canal into absorbable form for assimilation into the system.
2.
to promote the digestion of (food).
3.
to obtain information, ideas, or principles from; assimilate mentally: to digest a pamphlet on nuclear waste.
4.
to arrange methodically in the mind; think over: to digest a plan.
5.
to bear with patience; endure.
6.
to arrange in convenient or methodical order; reduce to a system; classify.
7.
to condense, abridge, or summarize.
8.
Chemistry. to soften or disintegrate (a substance) by means of moisture, heat, chemical action, or the like.
verb (used without object)
9.
to digest food.
10.
to undergo digestion, as food.
noun
11.
a collection or compendium, usually of literary, historical, legal, or scientific matter, especially when classified or condensed.
12.
Law.
a.
a systematic abstract of some body of law.
b.
the Digest, a collection in fifty books of excerpts, especially from the writings of the Classical Roman jurists, compiled by order of Justinian in the 6th century a.d.; the Pandects.
13.
Biochemistry. the product of the action of an enzyme on food or other organic material.

Origin:
1350–1400; (v.) Middle English digesten < Latin dīgestus separated, dissolved (past participle of dīgerere), equivalent to dī- di-2 + ges- carry, bear (base of gerere) + -tus past participle suffix; (noun) Middle English: collection of laws < Late Latin dīgesta (plural), Latin: collection of writings, neuter plural of dīgestus, as above

digestedly, adverb
digestedness, noun
half-digested, adjective
nondigesting, adjective
overdigest, verb
redigest, verb (used with object)
semidigested, adjective
undigested, adjective
undigesting, adjective
well-digested, adjective


4. understand; study, ponder. 6. systematize, codify. 11. epitome, abridgment. See summary.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
digest
 
vb
1.  to subject (food) to a process of digestion
2.  (tr) to assimilate mentally
3.  chem to soften or disintegrate or be softened or disintegrated by the action of heat, moisture, or chemicals; decompose
4.  (tr) to arrange in a methodical or systematic order; classify
5.  (tr) to reduce to a summary
6.  archaic (tr) to tolerate
 
n
7.  a comprehensive and systematic compilation of information or material, often condensed
8.  a magazine, periodical, etc, that summarizes news of current events
9.  a compilation of rules of law based on decided cases
 
[C14: from Late Latin dīgesta writings grouped under various heads, from Latin dīgerere to divide, from di- apart + gerere to bear]

Digest (ˈdaɪdʒɛst)
 
n
Roman law an arrangement of excerpts from the writings and opinions of eminent lawyers, contained in 50 books compiled by order of Justinian in the sixth century ad

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

digest
"collection of writing," late 14c., from L. digestus, pp. of digerere "to separate, divide, arrange," from dis- "apart" + gerere "to carry."

digest
"assimilate food in bowels," mid-15c. (digestion is earlier), from L. digestus (see digest (n.)). Related: Digested.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

digest di·gest (dī-jěst', dĭ-)
v. di·gest·ed, di·gest·ing, di·gests

  1. To convert food into simpler chemical compounds that can be absorbed and assimilated by the body, as by chemical and muscular action in the alimentary canal.

  2. To soften or disintegrate by means of chemical action, heat, or moisture.


di·gest'i·bil'i·ty n.
di·gest'i·ble adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

digest definition


A periodical collection of messages which have been posted to a newsgroup or mailing list. A digest is prepared by a moderator who selects articles from the group or list, formats them and adds a contents list. The digest is then either mailed to an alternative mailing list or posted to an alternative newsgroup.
Some news readers and electronic mail programs provide commands to "undigestify" a digest, i.e. to split it up into individual articles which may then be read and saved or discarded separately.

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

digest

collection of passages from the writings of Roman jurists, arranged in 50 books and subdivided into titles according to the subject matter. In AD 530 the Roman emperor Justinian entrusted its compilation to the jurist Tribonian with instructions to appoint a commission to help him. The Pandects were published in AD 533 and given statutory force (see also Justinian, Code of), which they retained into the Middle Ages in the Byzantine Empire. Early in the 19th century the term Pandectists was applied to the historical school of Roman-law scholars in Germany who resumed the scientific study of the Pandects. The leader of the school was Friedrich Karl von Savigny.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences for Digest
After gorging itself, the colo retreats to its cave dwelling to hibernate and digest.
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