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disavow

[dis-uh-vou] /ˌdɪs əˈvaʊ/
verb (used with object)
1.
to disclaim knowledge of, connection with, or responsibility for; disown; repudiate:
He disavowed the remark that had been attributed to him.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English disavouen, desavouen < Anglo-French, Old French desavouer. See dis-1, avow
Related forms
disavowedly, adverb
disavower, noun
Synonyms
deny, reject, disclaim.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for disavow
  • Judicial nominees, meanwhile, scrambled to disavow positions they had taken before the society.
  • The university can disavow him publicly, of course, while still affirming the worth of tenure.
  • For it to disavow its regulatory lusts would be a prodigious act of self-denial.
  • But, if you are captured or killed, the secretary will disavow any knowledge of this post.
  • In the name of reconciliation, politicians disavow the militias that once killed on their behalf.
  • But to disavow all bumping as being impossible based on this uncertainty seems to miss the danger which bumping can pose.
  • The authorities mendaciously claimed that he has been released, a tactic that helps them disavow responsibility.
  • Although she never once expressed regret, she did seem to disavow any active choice in the matter.
  • It's about life in hipster enclaves, and the self-consciousness that makes hipsters desperately disavow the label.
  • Which is why some will want to disavow objective facts.
British Dictionary definitions for disavow

disavow

/ˌdɪsəˈvaʊ/
verb
1.
(transitive) to deny knowledge of, connection with, or responsibility for
Derived Forms
disavowal, noun
disavowedly, adverb
disavower, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for disavow
v.

late 14c., from Old French desavouer (13c.), from des- "opposite of" (see dis-) + avouer (see avow). Related: Disavowed; disavowing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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