eavesdrop

[eevz-drop]
verb (used without object), eavesdropped, eavesdropping.
1.
to listen secretly to a private conversation.
verb (used with object), eavesdropped, eavesdropping.
2.
Archaic. to eavesdrop on.
noun Also, eavesdrip [eevz-drip] .
3.
water that drips from the eaves.
4.
the ground on which such water falls.

Origin:
before 900; (noun) Middle English evesdrope, evesdripe, Old English yfesdrype; as v., probably back formation from eavesdropper, late Middle English evisdroppyr, apparently literally, one who stands on the eavesdrop in order to listen to conversations inside the house; see eave, drop, drip

eavesdropper, noun
antieavesdropping, adjective
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World English Dictionary
eavesdrop (ˈiːvzˌdrɒp)
 
vb , -drops, -dropping, -dropped
(intr) to listen secretly to the private conversation of others
 
[C17: back formation from earlier evesdropper, from Old English yfesdrype water dripping from the eaves; see eaves, drop; compare Old Norse upsardropi]
 
'eavesdropper
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

eavesdrop
c.1600, back formation from eavesdropper. Related: Eavesdropping.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
It means little advantage for eavesdropping and so forth-one makes sounds.
There are some new techniques being developed to close these visual
  eavesdropping gaps.
We all know that babies start eavesdropping while they're still in the womb.
What began as a casual, curious eavesdropping soon turned into a series of
  confrontations.
Synonyms
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