embouchure

[ahm-boo-shoor, ahm-boo-shoor; French ahn-boo-shyr]
noun, plural embouchures [ahm-boo-shoorz, ahm-boo-shoorz; French ahn-boo-shyr] .
1.
the mouth of a river.
2.
the opening out of a valley into a plain.
3.
Music.
a.
the mouthpiece of a wind instrument.
b.
the adjustment of a player's mouth to such a mouthpiece.

Origin:
1750–60; < French, equivalent to embouch(er) to put (an instrument) to one's mouth (em- em- + bouche mouth < Latin bucca puffed cheek) + -ure -ure

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World English Dictionary
embouchure (ˌɒmbʊˈʃʊə)
 
n
1.  the mouth of a river or valley
2.  music
 a.  the correct application of the lips and tongue in playing a wind instrument
 b.  the mouthpiece of a wind instrument
 
[C18: from French, from Old French emboucher to put to one's mouth, from bouche mouth, from Latin bucca cheek]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

embouchure
1792, from Fr. embouchure "river mouth, mouth of a wind instrument," from en- "in" + bouche "mouth" (see bouche).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
He began his musical studies on the trumpet, but a car accident ruined his embouchure.
His trumpet playing abruptly ended after a car accident that damaged his embouchure.
Musical expression is provided by changes in the air pressure and embouchure.
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