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Euclidean

[yoo-klid-ee-uh n] /yuˈklɪd i ən/
adjective
1.
of or pertaining to Euclid, or adopting his postulates.
Also, Euclidian.
Origin
1650-1660
1650-60; < Latin Euclīdē(us) of Euclid (< Greek Eukleídeios) + -an
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Word Origin and History for Euclidean
adj.

1650s, "of or pertaining to Euclid," from Greek Eukleides, c.300 B.C.E. geometer of Alexandria. Now often used in contrast to alternative models based on rejection of some of his axioms. His name in Greek means "renowned," from eu "well" (see eu-) + kleos "fame" (see Clio).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Euclidean in Science
Euclidean
  (y-klĭd'ē-ən)   
Relating to geometry of plane figures based on the five postulates (axioms) of Euclid, involving the derivation of theorems from those postulates. The five postulates are: 1. Any two points can be joined by a straight line. 2. Any straight line segment can be extended indefinitely in a straight line. 3. Given any straight line segment, a circle can be drawn having the line segment as radius and an endpoint as center. 4. All right angles are congruent. 5. (Also called the parallel postulate.) If two lines are drawn that intersect a third in such a way that the sum of inner angles on one side is less than the sum of two right triangles, then the two lines will intersect each other on that side if the lines are extended far enough. Compare non-Euclidean.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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