extort

[ik-stawrt]
verb (used with object)
1.
Law.
a.
to wrest or wring (money, information, etc.) from a person by violence, intimidation, or abuse of authority; obtain by force, torture, threat, or the like.
b.
to take illegally by reason of one's office.
2.
to compel (something) of a person or thing: Her wit and intelligence extorted their admiration.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English (adj.) < Latin extortus, past participle of extorquēre, equivalent to ex- ex-1 + torquēre to twist

extorter, noun
extortive, adjective
nonextortive, adjective
unextorted, adjective


1. See extract.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
extort (ɪkˈstɔːt)
 
vb
1.  to secure (money, favours, etc) by intimidation, violence, or the misuse of influence or authority
2.  to obtain by importunate demands: the children extorted a promise of a trip to the zoo
3.  to overcharge for (something, esp interest on a loan)
 
[C16: from Latin extortus wrenched out, from extorquēre to wrest away, from torquēre to twist, wrench]
 
ex'torter
 
n
 
ex'tortive
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

extort
1520s, from L. extort-, pp. stem of extorquere (see extortion). Related: Extorted; extorting; extortionate; extortionist.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
All the while, their families were extorted for more money.
Nothing suggests the statements were extorted from appellant by false promises.
The gang also extorted or robbed individuals who lived or worked in their territory.
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