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gossip

[gos-uh p] /ˈgɒs əp/
noun
1.
idle talk or rumor, especially about the personal or private affairs of others:
the endless gossip about Hollywood stars.
2.
light, familiar talk or writing.
3.
Also, gossiper, gossipper. a person given to tattling or idle talk.
4.
Chiefly British Dialect. a godparent.
5.
Archaic. a friend, especially a woman.
verb (used without object), gossiped or gossipped, gossiping or gossipping.
6.
to talk idly, especially about the affairs of others; go about tattling.
verb (used with object), gossiped or gossipped, gossiping or gossipping.
7.
Chiefly British Dialect. to stand godparent to.
8.
Archaic. to repeat like a gossip.
Origin
1050
before 1050; Middle English gossib, godsib(be), Old English godsibb, orig. godparent, equivalent to god God + sibb related; see sib
Related forms
gossipingly, adverb
intergossip, verb, intergossiped or intergossipped, intergossiping.
ungossiping, adjective
Synonyms
1. small talk, hearsay, palaver, chitchat. Gossip, scandal apply to idle talk and newsmongering about the affairs of others. Gossip is light chat or talk: to trade gossip about the neighbors. Scandal is rumor or general talk that is damaging to reputation; it is usually more or less malicious: The town never lived down the election scandal. 3. chatterer, talker, gabbler, rumormonger. 6. chatter, prattle, prate, palaver.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for gossip
  • We were able to talk about our friendship and, as academics do, gossip a bit about the profession.
  • When stressful times arise, so do rumors and gossip.
  • Office gossip can be good for you as long as you do it right.
  • But in general, we frown on gossips.
  • The author interviewed at least 84 people and accumulated a great deal of tittle-tattle and gossip.
  • If gossip somehow brings forth actual knowledge, so be it.
  • He preferred to gossip.
  • It is just so much gossip.
  • This is about gossip and a need for media attention.
  • Then they just sit around and gossip.
British Dictionary definitions for gossip

gossip1

/ˈɡɒsɪp/
noun
1.
casual and idle chat to have a gossip with a friend
2.
a conversation involving malicious chatter or rumours about other people a gossip about the neighbours
3.
Also called gossipmonger. a person who habitually talks about others, esp maliciously
4.
light easy communication to write a letter full of gossip
5.
(archaic) a close woman friend
verb -sips, -siping, -siped
6.
(intransitive) often foll by about. to talk casually or maliciously (about other people)
Derived Forms
gossiper, noun
gossiping, noun, adjective
gossipingly, adverb
gossipy, adjective
Word Origin
Old English godsibb godparent, from god + sib; the term came to be applied to familiar friends, esp a woman's female friends at the birth of a child, hence a person, esp a woman, fond of light talk
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for gossip
gossip
O.E. godsibb "godparent," from God + sibb "relative" (see sibling). Extended in M.E. to "any familiar acquaintance" (mid-14c.), especially to woman friends invited to attend a birth, later to "anyone engaging in familiar or idle talk" (1560s). Sense extended 1811 to "trifling talk, groundless rumor." The verb meaning "to talk idly about the affairs of others" is from 1620s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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9
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