hawking

hawking

[haw-king]

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English; see hawk1, -ing1

Dictionary.com Unabridged

Hawking

[haw-king]
noun
Stephen William, born 1942, English mathematician and theoretical physicist.

hawk

1 [hawk]
noun
1.
any of numerous birds of prey of the family Accipitridae, having a short, hooked beak, broad wings, and curved talons, often seen circling or swooping at low altitudes.
2.
any of several similar, unrelated birds, as the nighthawk.
3.
Informal. a person who preys on others, as a sharper.
4.
Also called war hawk. Informal. a person, especially one in public office, who advocates war or a belligerent national attitude. Compare dove ( def 5 ).
5.
any person who pursues an aggressive policy in business, government, etc.: The corporation is now run by a bunch of young hawks.
verb (used without object)
6.
to fly, or hunt on the wing, like a hawk.
7.
to hunt with hawks.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English hauk(e), Old English hafoc; cognate with Old Frisian havek, Old Saxon habuc Old High German habuh, Old Norse haukr hawk, perhaps Polish kobuz kind of falcon

hawklike, adjective

hawk

2 [hawk]
verb (used with object)
1.
to peddle or offer for sale by calling aloud in public.
2.
to advertise or offer for sale: to hawk soap on television.
3.
to spread (rumors, news, etc.).
verb (used without object)
4.
to carry wares about for sale; peddle.

Origin:
1470–80; back formation from hawker2

hawk

3 [hawk]
verb (used without object)
1.
to make an effort to raise phlegm from the throat; clear the throat noisily.
verb (used with object)
2.
to raise by hawking: to hawk phlegm up.
noun
3.
a noisy effort to clear the throat.

Origin:
1575–85; imitative; see haw1

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
hawk1 (hɔːk)
 
n
1.  any of various diurnal birds of prey of the family Accipitridae, such as the goshawk and Cooper's hawk, typically having short rounded wings and a long tailRelated: accipitrine
2.  (US), (Canadian) any of various other falconiform birds, including the falcons but not the eagles or vultures
3.  Compare dove a person who advocates or supports war or warlike policies
4.  a ruthless or rapacious person
5.  know a hawk from a handsaw to be able to judge things; be discerning
 
vb
6.  (intr) to hunt with falcons, hawks, etc
7.  (intr) (of falcons or hawks) to fly in quest of prey
8.  to pursue or attack on the wing, as a hawk
 
Related: accipitrine
 
[Old English hafoc; related to Old Norse haukr, Old Frisian havek, Old High German habuh, Polish kobuz]
 
'hawklike1
 
adj

hawk2 (hɔːk)
 
vb (often foll by about)
1.  to offer (goods) for sale, as in the street
2.  to spread (news, gossip, etc)
 
[C16: back formation from hawker1]

hawk3 (hɔːk)
 
vb
1.  (intr) to clear the throat noisily
2.  (tr) to force (phlegm) up from the throat
3.  (Brit) a slang word for spit
 
n
4.  a noisy clearing of the throat
 
[C16: of imitative origin; see haw²]

hawk4 (hɔːk)
 
n
Also called: mortar board a small square board with a handle underneath, used for carrying wet plaster or mortar
 
[of unknown origin]

hawking (ˈhɔːkɪŋ)
 
n
another name for falconry

Hawking (ˈhɔːkɪŋ)
 
n
Stephen William. Born 1942, British physicist. Stricken with a progressive nervous disease since the 1960s, he has nevertheless been a leader in cosmological theory. His A Brief History of Time (1987) was a bestseller

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

hawk
O.E. hafoc (W. Saxon), from P.Gmc. *khabukaz (cf. O.N. haukr, M.Du. havik, Ger. Habicht "hawk"), from a root meaning "to seize," fro PIE *gabh- (cf. Rus. kobec "a kind of falcon"). Hawkish "militaristic" first attested 1965; hawk in this sense is attested from 1962.

hawk
1542 (hawker is attested from 1510), from M.L.G. höken "to peddle, carry on the back, squat," from P.Gmc. *khuk-. Despite the etymological connection with stooping under a burden on one's back, a hawker is technically distinguished from a peddler by use of a horse and cart or a van.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
Hawking   (hô'kĭng)  Pronunciation Key 
British physicist noted for his study of black holes and the origin of the universe, especially the big bang theory. His work has provided much of the mathematical basis for scientific explanations of the physical properties of black holes.

Our Living Language  : The world-renowned theoretical physicist and cosmologist Stephen Hawking needs little introduction to those familiar with the bespectacled man who uses a wheelchair and lectures around the world with the aid of a computerized speech synthesizer. The condition that has left him all but totally paralyzed, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is usually fatal within a few years; but Hawking has beaten the odds by living with the disease for all his adult life, since its onset when he was a 20-year-old college student. Hawking's story is a testament to a determined person's ability to overcome unexpected adversity—his career in fact did not take off until after the disease had been diagnosed. Hawking partly credits the disease for giving him a sense of purpose and the ability to enjoy life. His academic position at Oxford is a chaired professorship in mathematics that was also held by Isaac Newton, in 1669. He originally set out to study mathematics, but it is for his discoveries in physics that he is best known. With his collaborator Roger Penrose, he theorized that Einstein's Theory of General Relativity predicts that space and time have a definite origin and conclusion, providing mathematical support for the Big Bang theory. This led to further attempts to unify General Relativity with quantum theory, one consequence of which is the intriguing view that black holes are not entirely "black," as originally thought, but emit radiation and should eventually evaporate and disappear.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Slang Dictionary

hawk definition


  1. n.
    someone who supports a warlike U.S. defense policy. (Compare this with dove.) : The hawks want to raise taxes and buy tanks.
  2. in.
    to cough mightily; to cough something up. : The cold has had me hawking for a week.
  3. n.
    the hawk the cold winter wind. (Originally black. Always with the in this sense. See also Mr. Hawkins.) : Man, just feel the hawk cut through you!
Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition.
Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw-Hill Education.
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Hawk definition


(Heb. netz, a word expressive of strong and rapid flight, and hence appropriate to the hawk). It is an unclean bird (Lev. 11:16; Deut. 14:15). It is common in Syria and surrounding countries. The Hebrew word includes various species of Falconidae, with special reference perhaps to the kestrel (Falco tinnunculus), the hobby (Hypotriorchis subbuteo), and the lesser kestrel (Tin, Cenchris). The kestrel remains all the year in Palestine, but some ten or twelve other species are all migrants from the south. Of those summer visitors to Palestine special mention may be made of the Falco sacer and the Falco lanarius. (See NIGHT-HAWK ØT0002729.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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