hockers'

hock

3 [hok]
verb (used with object)
1.
noun
2.
the state of being deposited or held as security; pawn: She was forced to put her good jewelry in hock.
3.
the condition of owing; debt: After the loan was paid, he was finally out of hock.

Origin:
1855–60, Americanism; < Dutch hok kennel, sty, pen, (informal) miserable place to live, prison

hocker, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To Hockers'
Collins
World English Dictionary
hock1 (hɒk)
 
n
1.  the joint at the tarsus of a horse or similar animal, pointing backwards and corresponding to the human ankle
2.  the corresponding joint in domestic fowl
 
vb
3.  another word for hamstring
 
[C16: short for hockshin, from Old English hōhsinu heel sinew]

hock2 (hɒk)
 
n
1.  any of several white wines from the German Rhine
2.  (not in technical usage) any dry white wine
 
[C17: short for obsolete hockamoreHochheimer]

hock3 (hɒk)
 
vb
1.  (tr) to pawn or pledge
 
n
2.  the state of being in pawn (esp in the phrase in hock)
3.  in hock
 a.  in prison
 b.  in debt
 c.  in pawn
 
[C19: from Dutch hok prison, debt]
 
'hocker3
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

hock
"joint in the hind leg of a horse," 1540, earlier hockshin, from O.E. hoh-sinu "Achilles' tendon," lit. "heel sinew," from hoh "heel," from P.Gmc. *khankha- (cf. Ger. Hachse "hock," O.E. hæla "heel").

hock
"Rhenish wine," 1625, shortening of Hockamore, from Ger. Hochheimer, from Hochheim, town on the Main where wine was made, sense extended to Ger. white wines in general.

hock
"pawn, debt," first recorded 1859 in Amer.Eng. as in hock, which meant both "in debt" and "in prison," from Du. hok "jail, pen, doghouse." The verb is 1878, from the noun.
"When one gambler is caught by another, smarter than himself, and is beat, then he is in hock. Men are only caught, or put in hock, on the race-tracks, or on the steamboats down South. ... Among thieves a man is in hock when he is in prison." [G.W. Matsell, "Vocabulum," 1859]
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Related Searches
Synonyms
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature