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hydrate

[hahy-dreyt] /ˈhaɪ dreɪt/
noun
1.
any of a class of compounds containing chemically combined water. In the case of some hydrates, as washing soda, Na 2 CO 3 ⋅10H 2 O, the water is loosely held and is easily lost on heating; in others, as sulfuric acid, SO 3 ⋅H 2 O, or H 2 SO 4 , it is strongly held as water of constitution.
verb (used with object), verb (used without object), hydrated, hydrating.
2.
to combine chemically with water.
Origin
1795-1805
1795-1805; hydr-1 + -ate2
Related forms
hydration, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for hydration
  • They also, apparently, are fond of breaking water pipes and bathrooms in their quest for hydration.
  • Comfort care involves primarily pain management, hydration, and little else.
  • Your mouth will get dry, and hydration will make you feel better.
  • If the sole intention is to terminate feeding and hydration, there is no need to remove a gastric feeding tube.
  • Salomon also makes a well-fitting hydration vest that carries water and nutrition.
  • Manipulating hydration was really my starting point.
  • Indeed, in medical emergencies, coconut water has been used intravenously when conventional hydration fluids were not available.
  • Machines supplied him with nourishment and hydration.
  • If you were a runner not willing to give up some of your time for hydration, you were gonna get yourself into trouble today.
  • The good doctors came to the conclusion that there are not enough studies to prove one or the other way about hydration.
British Dictionary definitions for hydration

hydrate

/ˈhaɪdreɪt/
noun
1.
a chemical compound containing water that is chemically combined with a substance and can usually be expelled without changing the constitution of the substance
2.
a chemical compound that can dissociate reversibly into water and another compound. For example sulphuric acid (H2SO4) dissociates into sulphur trioxide (SO3) and water (H2O)
3.
(not in technical usage) a chemical compound, such as a carbohydrate, that contains hydrogen and oxygen atoms in the ratio two to one
verb
4.
to undergo or cause to undergo treatment or impregnation with water
Derived Forms
hydration, noun
hydrator, noun
Word Origin
C19: from hydro- + -ate1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for hydration
n.

1854, noun of action from hydrate.

hydrate

n.

1802, "compound of water and another chemical," from French hydrate, coined c.1800 by French chemist Joseph-Louis Proust (1754-1826) from Greek hydr-, stem of hydor "water" (see water (n.1)).

v.

1850, "to form a hydrate;" 1947 as "to restore moisture;" from Greek hydr-, stem of hydor "water" (see water (n.1)) + -ate (2). Related: Hydrated; hydrating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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hydration in Medicine

hydrate hy·drate (hī'drāt')
n.
A solid compound containing water molecules combined in a definite ratio as an integral part of a crystal. v. hy·drat·ed, hy·drat·ing, hy·drates

  1. To rehydrate.

  2. To supply water to a person or thing in order to restore or maintain fluid balance.

hydration hy·dra·tion (hī-drā'shən)
n.

  1. The addition of water to a chemical molecule without hydrolysis.

  2. The process of providing an adequate amount of liquid to bodily tissues.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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hydration in Science
hydrate
  (hī'drāt')   
Noun  A compound produced by combining a substance chemically with water. Many minerals and crystalline substances are hydrates.

Verb  
  1. To combine a compound with water, especially to form a hydrate.

  2. To supply water to a person in order to restore or maintain a balance of fluids.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Article for hydration

hydrate

any compound containing water in the form of H2O molecules, usually, but not always, with a definite content of water by weight. The best-known hydrates are crystalline solids that lose their fundamental structures upon removal of the bound water. Exceptions to this are the zeolites (aluminum silicate minerals or their synthetic analogues that contain water in indefinite amounts) as well as similar clay minerals, certain clays, and metallic oxides, which have variable proportions of water in their hydrated forms; zeolites lose and regain water reversibly with little or no change in structure

Learn more about hydrate with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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