incarcerate

[v. in-kahr-suh-reyt; adj. in-kahr-ser-it, -suh-reyt]
verb (used with object), incarcerated, incarcerating.
1.
to imprison; confine.
2.
to enclose; constrict closely.
adjective

Origin:
1520–30; < Medieval Latin incarcerātus past participle of incarcerāre to imprison, equivalent to in- in-2 + carcer prison + -ātus -ate1

incarceration, noun
incarcerative, adjective
incarcerator, noun
unincarcerated, adjective


1. jail, immure, intern.
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World English Dictionary
incarcerate (ɪnˈkɑːsəˌreɪt)
 
vb
(tr) to confine or imprison
 
[C16: from Medieval Latin incarcerāre, from Latin in-² + carcer prison]
 
incarcer'ation
 
n
 
in'carcerator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

incarcerated in·car·cer·at·ed (ĭn-kär'sə-rā'tĭd)
adj.
Confined or trapped, as a hernia.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
There is nothing more frustrating than being incarcerated at a panel while
  someone goes over the time limit.
The sentence ensures that she will be incarcerated during an election the
  ruling junta plans to hold next year.
Many of the incarcerated mothers were not model parents before they ran afoul
  of the law.
While incarcerated and awaiting trial, he was sent two cakes-one with chocolate
  icing, one with white icing.
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