incipient

[in-sip-ee-uhnt]
adjective
beginning to exist or appear; in an initial stage: an incipient cold.

Origin:
1580–90; < Latin incipient- (stem of incipiēns, present participle of incipere to take in hand, begin), equivalent to in- in-2 + -cipi- (combining form of capi- take) + -ent- -ent

incipiently, adverb

incipient, insipid, insipient.


beginning, nascent, developing.
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World English Dictionary
incipient (ɪnˈsɪpɪənt)
 
adj
just starting to be or happen; beginning
 
[C17: from Latin incipiēns, from incipere to begin, take in hand, from in-² + capere to take]
 
in'cipience
 
n
 
in'cipiency
 
n
 
in'cipiently
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin & History

incipient
1669, from L. incipientem (nom. incipiens), prp. of incipere "begin, take up," from in- "on" + -cipere, comb. form of capere "to take" (see capable).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Cell phones are a surrogate telecom infrastructure for the nation's incipient
  economy.
But a number of specific themes have punctuated their discourse, lending it an
  incipient plausibility and coherence.
It need not be supposed that all varieties or incipient species attain the rank
  of species.
The symptom in the true neuroses is frequently the nucleus and incipient stage
  of development of the psychoneurotic symptom.
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