kirchhoff's laws

Kirchhoff's law

noun Physics, Electricity.
1.
the law that the algebraic sum of the currents flowing toward any point in an electric network is zero.
2.
the law that the algebraic sum of the products of the current and resistance in the conductors forming a closed loop in a network is equal to the algebraic sum of the electromotive forces in the loop.

Origin:
1865–70; named after G. R. Kirchhoff

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Kirchhoff's laws
 
pl n
two laws describing the flow of currents in electric circuits. The first states that the algebraic sum of all the electric currents meeting at any point in a circuit is zero. The second states that in a closed loop of a circuit the algebraic sum of the products of the resistances and the currents flowing through them is equal to the algebraic sum of all the electromotive forces acting in the loop
 
[C19: after G. R. Kirchoff (1824--87), German physicist]

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