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laborer

[ley-ber-er] /ˈleɪ bər ər/
noun
1.
a person engaged in work that requires bodily strength rather than skill or training:
a laborer in the field.
2.
any worker.
Origin
1275-1325
1275-1325; Middle English; see labor, -er1
Related forms
underlaborer, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for laborers
  • Most migrant workers, she says, are not free laborers.
  • We worked for a while as migrant farm laborers, and then three of us-three families-bought a farm.
  • One central figure holds up one of the fossil bones amidst a host of vigorous laborers.
  • There laborers are paid a pittance to smash, crack, melt and cook the materials out of old electronics.
  • The laborers who have been cheated and short changed by tight money.
  • In the new environment, executives change jobs as frequently as do migrant laborers.
  • As the hull construction progressed, laborers moved across scaffolds to drill holes through the hull wherever two planks met.
  • But it also makes a shortage of laborers a key challenge.
  • The tunnels are bored by laborers operating big manually powered augers.
  • It is always an occasion for regret to any community when a conflict arises between laborers and their employers.
Word Origin and History for laborers

laborer

n.

mid-14c., "manual worker," especially an unskilled one, agent noun from labor (v.). Meaning "member of the working class, member of the lowest social rank" is from c.1400.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Word Value for laborers

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