longshoreman

[lawng-shawr-muhn, -shohr-, long-]
noun, plural longshoremen.
a person employed on the wharves of a port, as in loading and unloading vessels.

Origin:
1805–15; longshore + -man


See -man.
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World English Dictionary
longshoreman (ˈlɒŋˌʃɔːmən)
 
n , pl -men
(US), (Canadian) Also called (in Britain and certain other countries): docker a man employed in the loading or unloading of ships

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

longshoreman
1811, from alongshore + man.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Everyone suffers from dialogue that would make the average longshoreman demand a rewrite.
In the hostile pubs it was wiser for a longshoreman and a reporter or any kind of writer not to be seen together.
The four longshoreman are placing and removing twist locks under the containers.
The third longshoreman was able to move out of the way of the spreader bar and was not injured.
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