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manor

[man-er] /ˈmæn ər/
noun
1.
(in England) a landed estate or territorial unit, originally of the nature of a feudal lordship, consisting of a lord's demesne and of lands within which he has the right to exercise certain privileges, exact certain fees, etc.
2.
any similar territorial unit in medieval Europe, as a feudal estate.
3.
the mansion of a lord with the land belonging to it.
4.
the main house or mansion on an estate, plantation, etc.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English maner < Old French manoir, noun use of manoir to remain, dwell < Latin manēre to remain; see mansion
Related forms
manorial
[muh-nawr-ee-uh l, -nohr-] /məˈnɔr i əl, -ˈnoʊr-/ (Show IPA),
adjective
intermanorial, adjective
submanor, noun
Can be confused
manna, manner, manor.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for manorial
  • With the breaking of the manorial system, commerce became an expanding and regular part of economic life.
  • Plowing should not be deep, and all manorial applications should be on the surface.
  • A manorial lord could not sell his serfs as a roman might sell his slaves.
British Dictionary definitions for manorial

manor

/ˈmænə/
noun
1.
(in medieval Europe) the manor house of a lord and the lands attached to it
2.
(before 1776 in some North American colonies) a tract of land granted with rights of inheritance by royal charter
3.
a manor house
4.
a landed estate
5.
(Brit, slang) a geographical area of operation, esp of a gang or local police force
Derived Forms
manorial (məˈnɔːrɪəl) adjective
Word Origin
C13: from Old French manoir dwelling, from maneir to dwell, from Latin manēre to remain
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for manorial
adj.

1785, from manor + -al (1).

manor

n.

late 13c., "mansion, habitation, country residence, principal house of an estate," from Anglo-French maner, Old French manoir "abode, home, dwelling place; manor" (12c.), noun use of maneir "to dwell," from Latin manere "to stay, abide," from PIE root *men- "to remain" (see mansion). As a unit of territorial division in Britain and some American colonies (usually "land held in demesne by a lord, with tenants") it is attested from 1530s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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