manor

[man-er]
noun
1.
(in England) a landed estate or territorial unit, originally of the nature of a feudal lordship, consisting of a lord's demesne and of lands within which he has the right to exercise certain privileges, exact certain fees, etc.
2.
any similar territorial unit in medieval Europe, as a feudal estate.
3.
the mansion of a lord with the land belonging to it.
4.
the main house or mansion on an estate, plantation, etc.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English maner < Old French manoir, noun use of manoir to remain, dwell < Latin manēre to remain; see mansion

manorial [muh-nawr-ee-uhl, -nohr-] , adjective
intermanorial, adjective
submanor, noun

manna, manner, manor.
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World English Dictionary
manor (ˈmænə)
 
n
1.  (in medieval Europe) the manor house of a lord and the lands attached to it
2.  (before 1776 in some North American colonies) a tract of land granted with rights of inheritance by royal charter
3.  a manor house
4.  a landed estate
5.  slang (Brit) a geographical area of operation, esp of a local police force
 
[C13: from Old French manoir dwelling, from maneir to dwell, from Latin manēre to remain]
 
manorial
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

manor
late 13c., "mansion, habitation, country residence, principal house of an estate," from Anglo-Fr. maner, from O.Fr. manoir "manor," noun use of maneir "to dwell," from L. manere "to stay, abide." As a unit of territorial division in Britain and some American colonies (usually "land held in demesne by
a lord, with tenants") it is attested from 1530s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
With the breaking of the manorial system, commerce became an expanding and regular part of economic life.
Plowing should not be deep, and all manorial applications should be on the surface.
A manorial lord could not sell his serfs as a roman might sell his slaves.
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