miscreant

[mis-kree-uhnt]
adjective
1.
depraved, villainous, or base.
2.
Archaic. holding a false or unorthodox religious belief; heretical.
noun
3.
a vicious or depraved person; villain.
4.
Archaic. a heretic or infidel.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Middle French mescreant unbelieving, equivalent to mes- mis-1 + creantLatin crēdent- credent

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miscreant (ˈmɪskrɪənt)
 
n
1.  a wrongdoer or villain
2.  archaic an unbeliever or heretic
 
adj
3.  evil or villainous
4.  archaic unbelieving or heretical
 
[C14: from Old French mescreant unbelieving, from mes-mis-1 + creant, ultimately from Latin credere to believe]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

miscreant
early 14c., "heretical, unbelieving, infidel," from O.Fr. mescreant, from mes- "wrongly" (see mis- (2)) + creant, prp. of creire "believe," from L. credere (see credit). The noun is attested from late 14c.; originally "heathen, Saracen;" sense of "villain" first recorded 1590 in Spenser.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
At home, she preferred to threaten high-ranking miscreants with exposure rather
  than execution.
They are apt to punish the messenger, not the miscreants.
Instead of miscreants, fashion them material makers.
In modern western society it used to be sailors, or gang members, or groups of
  miscreants.
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