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ode

[ohd] /oʊd/
noun
1.
a lyric poem typically of elaborate or irregular metrical form and expressive of exalted or enthusiastic emotion.
2.
(originally) a poem intended to be sung.
Origin
1580-1590
1580-90; < Middle French < Late Latin ōda < Greek ōidḗ, contraction of aoidḗ song, derivative of aeídein to sing
Can be confused
ode, owed.

-ode1

1.
a suffix of nouns, appearing in loanwords from Greek, where it meant “like”; used in the formation of compound words:
phyllode.
Compare -oid.
Origin
< Greek -ōdēs, probably generalized from adjectives describing smells, as kēṓdēs smelling like incense; base ōd- of ózein to smell, give off odor

-ode2

1.
a combining form meaning “way,” “road,” used in the formation of compound words:
anode; electrode.
Origin
< Greek -odos, combining form of hodós
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for ode
  • The event is an ode to magic's time-honored and gleeful distortion of scientific and technological principals.
  • The authorship of this stirring ode has been suspected by some, but known to few except its author.
  • He long planned to write a book that would serve as an ode to their greatness.
British Dictionary definitions for ode

ode

/əʊd/
noun
1.
a lyric poem, typically addressed to a particular subject, with lines of varying lengths and complex rhythms See also Horatian ode, Pindaric ode
2.
(formerly) a poem meant to be sung
Word Origin
C16: via French from Late Latin ōda, from Greek ōidē, from aeidein to sing

-ode1

combining form
1.
denoting resemblance: nematode
Word Origin
from Greek -ōdēs, from eidos shape, form

-ode2

combining form
1.
denoting a path or way: electrode
Word Origin
from Greek -odos, from hodos a way
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for ode
n.

1580s, from Middle French ode (c.1500), from Late Latin ode "lyric song," from Greek oide, Attic contraction of aoide "song, ode;" related to aeidein (Attic aidein) "to sing;" aoidos (Attic oidos) "a singer, singing;" aude "voice, tone, sound," probably from a PIE *e-weid-, perhaps from root *wed- "to speak." In classical use, "a poem intended to be sung;" in modern use usually a rhymed lyric, often an address, usually dignified, rarely extending to 150 lines. Related: Odic.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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ode in Medicine

-ode suff.
Way; path: electrode.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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ode in Culture

ode definition


A kind of poem devoted to the praise of a person, animal, or thing. An ode is usually written in an elevated style and often expresses deep feeling. An example is “Ode on a Grecian Urn,” by John Keats.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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ode in Technology

An Object-Oriented Database from AT&T which extends C++ and supports fast queries, complex application modelling and multimedia.
Ode uses one integrated data model (C++ classes) for both database and general purpose manipulation. An Ode database is a collection of persistent objects. It is defined, queried and manipulated using the language O++. O++ programs can be compiled with C++ programs, thus allowing the use of existing C++ code. O++ provides facilities for specifying transactions, creating and manipulating persistent objects, querying the database and creating and manipulating versions.
The Ode object database provides four object compatible mechanisms for manipulating and querying the database. As well as O++ there are OdeView - an X Window System interface; OdeFS (a file system interface allowing objects to be treated and manipulated like normal Unix files); and CQL++, a C++ variant of SQL for easing the transition from relational databases to OODBs such as Ode.
Ode supports large objects (critical for multimedia applications). Ode tracks the relationship between versions of objects and provides facilities for accessing different versions. Transactions can be specified as read-only; such transactions are faster because they are not logged and they are less likely to deadlock. 'Hypothetical' transactions allow users to pose "what-if" scenarios (as with spreadsheets).
EOS, the storage engine of Ode, is based on a client-server architecture. EOS supports concurrency based on multi-granularity two-version two-phase locking; it allows many readers and one writer to access the same item simultaneously. Standard two-phase locking is also available. Ode supports both a client-server mode for multiple users with concurrent access and a single user mode giving improved performance.
Ode 3.0 is currently being used as the multimedia database engine for AT&T's Interactive TV project. Ode 2.0 has also been distributed to more than 80 sites within AT&T and more than 340 universities. Ode is available free to universities under a non-disclosure agreement. The current version, 3.0, is available only for Sun SPARCstations running SunOS 4.1.3 and Solaris 2.3. Ode is being ported to Microsoft Windows NT, Windows 95 and SGI platforms.
E-mail: Narain Gehani .
(1994-08-18)
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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