Olbers' paradox

Olbers' paradox

[ohl-berz]
noun Astronomy.
the paradox that if the universe consisted of an infinite number of stars equally distributed through space, then every line of sight would come from a star and the night sky would glow uniformly, which is observationally not true.

Origin:
1950–55; after H.W.M. Olbers

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To Olbers' paradox
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

Olbers' paradox
"if stars are uniformly distributed through the sky, their number should counterbalance their faintness and the night sky should be as bright as the day;" named for Ger. astronomer H.W.M. Olbers (1758-1840), who propounded it in 1826.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Image for Olbers' paradox
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature