follow Dictionary.com

It’s about time. We are now on Instagram!

overcome

[oh-ver-kuhm] /ˌoʊ vərˈkʌm/
verb (used with object), overcame, overcome, overcoming.
1.
to get the better of in a struggle or conflict; conquer; defeat:
to overcome the enemy.
2.
to prevail over (opposition, a debility, temptations, etc.); surmount:
to overcome one's weaknesses.
3.
to overpower or overwhelm in body or mind, as does liquor, a drug, exertion, or emotion:
I was overcome with grief.
4.
Archaic. to overspread or overrun.
verb (used without object), overcame, overcome, overcoming.
5.
to gain the victory; win; conquer:
a plan to overcome by any means possible.
Origin
900
before 900; Middle English; Old English ofercuman. See over-, come
Related forms
overcomer, noun
unovercome, adjective
Synonyms
1. vanquish. See defeat.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for overcoming
  • He conceived both the evil in human nature and the process of overcoming it with strange, sublime simplicity.
  • They say it is quite overcoming-and people cannot help crying to see it.
  • My company has been approached by several firms with a view of overcoming the difficulty-Times.
  • The words that are being used about her today are all about resilience and endurance overcoming.
  • overcoming the deadly and lesser sins doesn't make for exciting gaming.
  • overcoming such opposition was essentially a sales job.
  • The two older cubs seem to be overcoming the romance problem.
  • At noon a village performed a play about a good spirit overcoming a mud-covered demon.
  • overcoming such denial is only possible through painful scientific process but that too has its limits.
  • Sometimes the hardest part is overcoming shyness with strangers.
British Dictionary definitions for overcoming

overcome

/ˌəʊvəˈkʌm/
verb -comes, -coming, -came, -come
1.
(transitive) to get the better of in a conflict
2.
(transitive; often passive) to render incapable or powerless by laughter, sorrow, exhaustion, etc: he was overcome by fumes
3.
(transitive) to surmount (obstacles, objections, etc)
4.
(intransitive) to be victorious
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for overcoming

overcome

v.

Old English ofercuman "to reach, overtake," also "to conquer, prevail over," from ofer (see over) + cuman "to come" (see come (v.)). A common Germanic compound (cf. Middle Dutch overkomen, Old High German ubarqueman, German überkommen). In reference to mental or chemical force, "to overwhelm, render helpless," it is in late Old English. Meaning "to surmount" (a difficulty or obstacle) is from c.1200. The Civil Rights anthem "We Shall Overcome" was put together c.1950s from lyrics from Charles Tindley's spiritual "I'll Overcome Some Day" (1901), and melody from pre-Civil War spiritual "No More Auction Block for Me." Related: Overcame; overcoming.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for overcome

Most English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for overcoming

18
23
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with overcoming