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puny

[pyoo-nee] /ˈpyu ni/
adjective, punier, puniest.
1.
of less than normal size and strength; weak.
2.
unimportant; insignificant; petty or minor:
a puny excuse.
3.
Obsolete, puisne.
Origin
1540-1550
1540-50; spelling variant of puisne
Related forms
punily, adverb
puniness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for puny
  • Both times he was rejected as being too small and too puny.
  • Begin with a puny budget, considerable resistance and no big names.
  • In the event, the rhetoric sounded musty as ever, and the announced changes looked puny.
  • For example, the giant whale shark feasts on these puny animals.
  • Planets, on the other hand, are too puny and cold to initiate fusion.
  • Most digital picture frames are limited to puny amounts of built-in memory or require external cards to beef up capacity.
  • These odd birds are good for eggs but too puny to make a meal.
  • But steelmakers are puny compared with their main suppliers and customers.
  • Westerners may laugh at the puny elevations and elevation gains of these peaks.
  • We are not harmed by this high voltage, because the amount of charge that flows is puny.
British Dictionary definitions for puny

puny

/ˈpjuːnɪ/
adjective -nier, -niest
1.
having a small physique or weakly constitution
2.
paltry; insignificant
Derived Forms
punily, adverb
puniness, noun
Word Origin
C16: from Old French puisnepuisne
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for puny
adj.

1570s, "inferior in rank" (1540s as a noun, "junior pupil, freshman"), from Middle French puisné (Modern French puîné), from Old French puisne "born later, younger, youngest" (12c., contrasted with aisné "first-born"), from puis nez, from puis "afterward" (from Vulgar Latin *postius, from Latin postea "after this, hereafter," from post "after," see post-, + ea "there") + Old French "born," from Latin natus, past participle of nasci "be born" (Old Latin gnasci; see genus). Sense of "small, weak, insignificant" first recorded 1590s. Cf. puisne. Related: Puniness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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