Pham Van Dong

Pham Van Dong

[fahm vahn dawng]
noun
1906–2000, Vietnamese political leader: prime minister of North Vietnam 1955–76 and of unified Vietnam 1976–86.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To Pham Van Dong
Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

pham van dong

Vietnamese revolutionary (b. March 1, 1906, Quang Ngai province, Annam [now Vietnam]-d. April 29, 2000, Hanoi, Vietnam), was an architect of Vietnam's communist revolution; he was prime minister of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam) from 1955 to 1976 and of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (reunified Vietnam) from 1976 to 1987. The son of a Confucian scholar, Dong joined Ho Chi Minh's Vietnamese Revolutionary Youth Association in the 1920s. He was arrested by the French authorities for being a communist organizer in 1929 and spent seven years in prison. In 1941 Dong, who had become one of Ho's most trusted advisers, helped Ho found the Viet Minh, a communist-dominated organization dedicated to ending French colonial rule in Vietnam. After Viet Minh guerrillas finally succeeded in defeating the French in 1954, Vietnam was partitioned and Dong was appointed prime minister of the North. As prime minister, Dong served as the North's principal spokesman during the Vietnam War and headed the government of the reunified Vietnam after the war was over. In the 1970s and '80s Dong firmly opposed attempts to implement liberal economic reforms, but his obstinate stance only contributed to mounting pressure on him to step down. He did so in 1987, in later years serving as a government adviser.

Learn more about Pham Van Dong with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;