Phrygians

Phrygian

[frij-ee-uhn]
adjective
1.
of or pertaining to Phrygia, its people, or their language.
noun
2.
a native or inhabitant of Phrygia.
3.
an Indo-European language that was the language of Phrygia.

Origin:
1570–80; < Latin Phrygiānus. See Phrygia, -an

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World English Dictionary
Phrygian (ˈfrɪdʒɪən)
 
adj
1.  of or relating to ancient Phrygia, its inhabitants, or their extinct language
2.  music See Hypo- of or relating to an authentic mode represented by the natural diatonic scale from E to E
3.  music (of a cadence) denoting a progression that leads a piece of music out of the major key and ends on the dominant chord of the relative minor key
 
n
4.  a native or inhabitant of ancient Phrygia
5.  an ancient language of Phrygia, belonging to the Thraco-Phrygian branch of the Indo-European family: recorded in a few inscriptions

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

Phrygian
c.1490, "native of Phrygia," region in ancient Asia Minor; Phrygian mode in Gk. music theory is from 1579. Phrygian cap (1796) was the type adopted by freed slaves in Roman times, and subsequently identified as the cap of Liberty.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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