follow Dictionary.com

Stories We Like: Novels For Language Lovers

plausible

[plaw-zuh-buh l] /ˈplɔ zə bəl/
adjective
1.
having an appearance of truth or reason; seemingly worthy of approval or acceptance; credible; believable:
a plausible excuse; a plausible plot.
2.
well-spoken and apparently, but often deceptively, worthy of confidence or trust:
a plausible commentator.
Origin
1535-1545
1535-45; < Latin plausibilis deserving applause, equivalent to plaus(us) (past participle of plaudere to applaud) + -ibilis -ible
Related forms
plausibility, plausibleness, noun
plausibly, adverb
nonplausibility, noun
nonplausible, adjective
nonplausibleness, noun
nonplausibly, adverb
overplausible, adjective
overplausibleness, noun
overplausibly, adverb
superplausible, adjective
superplausibleness, noun
superplausibly, adverb
unplausible, adjective
unplausibleness, noun
unplausibly, adverb
Synonyms
1. Plausible, specious describe that which has the appearance of truth but might be deceptive. The person or thing that is plausible strikes the superficial judgment favorably; it may or may not be true: a plausible argument (one that cannot be verified or believed in entirely). Specious definitely implies deceit or falsehood; the surface appearances are quite different from what is beneath: a specious pretense of honesty; a specious argument (one deliberately deceptive, probably for selfish or evil purposes).
Antonyms
1. honest, sincere.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for plausibility
  • Here is a final hypothesis, an admittedly complex one but also my favorite, for reasons that go beyond scientific plausibility.
  • But a number of specific themes have punctuated their discourse, lending it an incipient plausibility and coherence.
  • The plausibility of this system being useful in other clerkship has yet to be determined.
  • But the introduction of dark energy and runaway expansion actually take away from the plausibility of the big bang.
  • In the writer's opinion that answer has lost nothing of its plausibility.
  • The charge had a surface plausibility, because of the two athletes' records.
  • plausibility, as they say in the espionage business, was good.
  • Though few yet were known to the authorities, the details added plausibility to the story.
  • Lately, of course, such a worldview has acquired a new plausibility.
  • These prescriptions have the advantage of political plausibility.
British Dictionary definitions for plausibility

plausible

/ˈplɔːzəbəl/
adjective
1.
apparently reasonable, valid, truthful, etc: a plausible excuse
2.
apparently trustworthy or believable: a plausible speaker
Derived Forms
plausibility, plausibleness, noun
plausibly, adverb
Word Origin
C16: from Latin plausibilis worthy of applause, from plaudere to applaud
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for plausibility
n.

1590s, from plausible + -ity.

plausible

adj.

1540s, "acceptable, agreeable," from Latin plausibilis "deserving applause, acceptable," from plaus-, past participle stem of plaudere "to applaud" (see plaudit). Meaning "having the appearance of truth" is recorded from 1560s. Related: Plausibly.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for plausible

Many English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for plausibility

19
23
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with plausibility