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predestine

[pri-des-tin] /prɪˈdɛs tɪn/
verb (used with object), predestined, predestining.
1.
to destine in advance; foreordain; predetermine:
He seemed predestined for the ministry.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English predestinen < Latin praedestināre. See pre-, destine
Related forms
predestinable, adjective
unpredestined, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for predestined
  • So it's no longer our fault because it was all predestined.
  • They found that the gene was active in the stem cells predestined to become muscle, but switched off in the other version.
  • Perhaps the point is that history does not lock us into a predestined route.
  • Railway and steamboat journeys were, of course, predestined through the ages as aids to the enjoyment of reading.
  • Sawyer was thus predestined to time travel and bury the ring even if he had no idea of its existence.
  • And being committed to the idea that defeat was not predestined, he fails to adequately address the backstory.
  • It was a flight predisposed, if not predestined, to being late.
  • For many people, much of this is predestined by the time a student graduates with his or her bachelor's degree.
  • But the progress was not predestined nor is its future guaranteed.
British Dictionary definitions for predestined

predestine

/priːˈdɛstɪn/
verb (transitive)
1.
to foreordain; determine beforehand
2.
(theol) (of God) to decree from eternity (any event, esp the final salvation of individuals)
Derived Forms
predestinable, adjective
Word Origin
C14: from Latin praedestināre to resolve beforehand, from destināre to determine, destine
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for predestined

predestine

v.

late 14c., "to foreordain," from Old French prédestiner (12c.) "predestine, ordain" (of God) and directly from Latin praedestinare "determine beforehand" (see predestination). Related: Predestined; predestining; predestinate.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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