quotation

[kwoh-tey-shuhn]
noun
1.
something that is quoted; a passage quoted from a book, speech, etc.: a speech full of quotations from Lincoln's letters.
2.
the act or practice of quoting.
3.
Commerce.
a.
the statement of the current or market price of a commodity or security.
b.
the price so stated.

Origin:
1525–35; 1810–15 for def 3; < Medieval Latin quotātiōn- (stem of quotātiō), equivalent to quotāt(us) (past participle of quotāre; see quote) + -iōn- -ion

prequotation, noun
self-quotation, noun

quotation, quote.


1. extract, citation, selection.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
quotation (kwəʊˈteɪʃən)
 
n
1.  a phrase or passage from a book, poem, play, etc, remembered and spoken, esp to illustrate succinctly or support a point or an argument
2.  the act or habit of quoting from books, plays, poems, etc
3.  commerce a statement of the current market price of a security or commodity
4.  an estimate of costs submitted by a contractor to a prospective client; tender
5.  stock exchange registration granted to a company or governmental body, enabling the shares and other securities of the company or body to be officially listed and traded
6.  printing a large block of type metal that is less than type-high and is used to fill up spaces in type pages

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

quotation
1456, "numbering," later (1532) "marginal notation," from M.L. quotationem (nom. quotatio), from quotare "to number" (see quote). Meaning "passage quoted" is from 1690.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Quotations definition


from the Old Testament in the New, which are very numerous, are not made according to any uniform method. When the New Testament was written, the Old was not divided, as it now is, into chapters and verses, and hence such peculiarities as these: When Luke (20:37) refers to Ex. 3:6, he quotes from "Moses at the bush", i.e., the section containing the record of Moses at the bush. So also Mark (2:26) refers to 1 Sam. 21:1-6, in the words, "in the days of Abiathar;" and Paul (Rom. 11:2) refers to 1 Kings ch. 17-19, in the words, "in Elias", i.e., in the portion of the history regarding Elias. In general, the New Testament writers quote from the Septuagint (q.v.) version of the Old Testament, as it was then in common use among the Jews. But it is noticeable that these quotations are not made in any uniform manner. Sometimes, e.g., the quotation does not agree literally either with the LXX. or the Hebrew text. This occurs in about one hundred instances. Sometimes the LXX. is literally quoted (in about ninety instances), and sometimes it is corrected or altered in the quotations (in over eighty instances). Quotations are sometimes made also directly from the Hebrew text (Matt. 4:15, 16; John 19:37; 1 Cor. 15:54). Besides the quotations made directly, there are found numberless allusions, more or less distinct, showing that the minds of the New Testament writers were filled with the expressions and ideas as well as historical facts recorded in the Old. There are in all two hundred and eighty-three direct quotations from the Old Testament in the New, but not one clear and certain case of quotation from the Apocrypha (q.v.). Besides quotations in the New from the Old Testament, there are in Paul's writings three quotations from certain Greek poets, Acts 17:28; 1 Cor. 15:33; Titus 1:12. These quotations are memorials of his early classical education.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
Some of the quotations mentioning the lost books provide clues to their content.
Discuss the different ways that wilderness was represented in these quotations.
These poems and quotations are lasting testimonies to what our nation was, is,
  or aspires to be.
Yeah, but hopefully they'll fix the double quote problem soon: it makes
  quotations difficult.
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