reek

[reek]
noun
1.
a strong, unpleasant smell.
2.
vapor or steam.
verb (used without object)
3.
to smell strongly and unpleasantly.
4.
to be strongly pervaded with something unpleasant or offensive.
5.
to give off steam, smoke, etc.
6.
to be wet with sweat, blood, etc.
verb (used with object)
7.
to give off; emit; exude.
8.
to expose to or treat with smoke.

Origin:
before 900; (noun) Middle English rek(e), Old English rēc smoke; cognate with German rauch, Dutch rook, Old Norse reykr; (v.) Middle English reken to smoke, steam, Old English rēocan

reeker, noun
reekingly, adverb
reeky, adjective


5. steam, smoke, fume.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
reek (riːk)
 
vb (often foll by of)
1.  (intr) to give off or emit a strong unpleasant odour; smell or stink
2.  to be permeated (by); be redolent (of): the letter reeks of subservience
3.  (tr) to treat with smoke; fumigate
4.  dialect chiefly (tr) to give off or emit (smoke, fumes, vapour, etc)
 
n
5.  a strong offensive smell; stink
6.  dialect chiefly smoke or steam; vapour
 
[Old English rēocan; related to Old Frisian riāka to smoke, Old High German rouhhan, Old Norse rjūka to smoke, steam]
 
'reeking
 
adj
 
'reekingly
 
adv
 
'reeky
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

reek
O.E. rec (Anglian), riec (W.Saxon), "smoke from burning material," probably from O.N. reykr (cf. Reykjavik, lit. "smoky bay"), from P.Gmc. *raukiz (cf. O.Fris. rek, M.Du. rooc, O.H.G. rouh, Ger. Rauch "smoke, steam"), apparently not found outside Gmc. Sense of "stench" is attested 1659, via the notion
of "that which rises." The verb is from O.E. recan (Anglian), reocan (W.Saxon), from P.Gmc. *reukanan (cf. Ger. rauchen "to smoke," riechen "to smell"). Originally "to emit smoke;" meaning "to emit a bad smell" is recorded from 1710.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
But for now, this sad, desolate branch of the menu reeks of missed opportunity.
If the flurry of activity reeks of desperation, well, these are desperate times.
The present way of proprietary, closed non-peer reviewed licensed results reeks.
Every ordinary jail reeks with this moral infection.
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