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re-sign

[ree-sahyn] /riˈsaɪn/
verb (used with object), verb (used without object)
1.
to sign again.
2.
to renew or extend a contract.
Origin
1795-1805
1795-1805
Can be confused
re-sign, resign.

resign

[ri-zahyn] /rɪˈzaɪn/
verb (used without object)
1.
to give up an office or position, often formally (often followed by from):
to resign from the presidency.
2.
to submit; yield:
to resign before the inevitable.
verb (used with object)
3.
to give up (an office, position, etc.), often formally.
4.
to relinquish (a right, claim, agreement, etc.).
5.
to give or sign over, as to the control or care of another:
She resigned her child to an adoption agency.
6.
to submit (oneself, one's mind, etc.) without resistance.
Origin
1325-75; Middle English resignen < Middle French resigner < Latin resignāre to open, release, cancel, equivalent to re- re- + signāre to mark, seal, sign
Can be confused
re-sign, resign.
Synonyms
1. withdraw. 3. abdicate, renounce; quit, leave. 4. give up, surrender, cede, forgo.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for resigning
  • The secretary, for instance, cannot relieve himself from the responsibility of his office by resigning.
  • But resigning in protest has gained popularity of late among an unlikely group: big corporations.
  • She needs to respond to the letters and points about her resigning.
  • People capable of resigning their intelligence this way can be expected to go berserk anytime, anywhere.
  • Her first memory of him was of watching his televised announcement that he was resigning the presidency.
  • She recently wrote me to ask about the etiquette of resigning her position.
  • But withdrawing the application and leave when the contract is over is considered resigning.
  • If you think it is not justified and you do not plan to appeal, then resigning with good terms is still good.
  • Her board chairman had informed her that some key administrators, unhappy with her leadership, were on the verge of resigning.
  • Ours requires a resignation in writing one month before the date as of which you are resigning.
British Dictionary definitions for resigning

resign

/rɪˈzaɪn/
verb
1.
when intr, often foll by from. to give up tenure of (a job, office, etc)
2.
(transitive) to reconcile (oneself) to; yield: to resign oneself to death
3.
(transitive) to give up (a right, claim, etc); relinquish: he resigned his claim to the throne
Derived Forms
resigner, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French resigner, from Latin resignāre to unseal, invalidate, destroy, from re- + signāre to seal; see sign

re-sign

/riːˈsaɪn/
verb
1.
to sign (a document, etc) again
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for resigning

resign

v.

late 14c., "give up, surrender, abandon, submit; relinquish," from Old French resigner "renounce, relinquish" (13c.), from Latin resignare "to check off, annul, cancel, give back, give up," from re- "opposite" (see re-) + signare "to make an entry in an account book," literally "to mark" (see sign (v.)).

The sense is of making an entry (signum) "opposite" -- on the credit side -- balancing the former mark and thus canceling the claim it represents. The specific meaning of "give up a position" is first recorded late 14c. Sense of "to give (oneself) up to some emotion or situation" is from 1718. Related: Resigned; resigning.

re-sign

v.

"sign again," 1805, from re- + sign (v.). Related: Re-signed; re-signing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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11
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