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scolding

[skohl-ding] /ˈskoʊl dɪŋ/
noun
1.
the action of a person who scolds; a rebuke; reproof:
I got a scolding for being late again.
Origin
late Middle English
1425-1475
1425-75; late Middle English; see scold, -ing1
Related forms
unscolding, adjective

scold

[skohld] /skoʊld/
verb (used with object)
1.
to find fault with angrily; chide; reprimand:
The teacher scolded me for being late.
verb (used without object)
2.
to find fault; reprove.
3.
to use abusive language.
noun
4.
a person who is constantly scolding, often with loud and abusive speech.
Origin
1150-1200; (noun) Middle English, variant of scald < Old Norse skald poet (as author of insulting poems); see skald; (v.) Middle English scolden, derivative of the noun
Related forms
scoldable, adjective
scolder, noun
scoldingly, adverb
outscold, verb (used with object)
unscolded, adjective
Synonyms
1. reprove; censure. See reproach.
Antonyms
1. praise.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for scolding
  • The effect of scolding was more pronounced when the dogs were obedient, not disobedient.
  • But there's no telling whether this is a one-off scolding or will translate into longer-term action.
  • We are not to think it absurd that he expresses a wish he could ease his mind by giving the culprit a good scolding.
  • She spent hours scolding, cajoling and groveling, on the phone and in single-spaced typed letters.
  • It came with a side of grits and a side of scolding.
  • These owls may also be spotted in the daytime being mobbed and teased by a flock of scolding birds.
British Dictionary definitions for scolding

scold

/skəʊld/
verb
1.
to find fault with or reprimand (a person) harshly; chide
2.
(intransitive) to use harsh or abusive language
noun
3.
a person, esp a woman, who constantly finds fault
Derived Forms
scoldable, adjective
scolder, noun
scolding, noun
scoldingly, adverb
Word Origin
C13: from Old Norse skald
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for scolding

scold

n.

mid-12c., "person of ribald speech," later "person fond of abusive language" (c.1300), especially a shrewish woman [Johnson defines it as "A clamourous, rude, mean, low, foul-mouthed woman"], from Old Norse skald "poet" (see skald). The sense evolution might reflect the fact that Germanic poets (like their Celtic counterparts) were famously feared for their ability to lampoon and mock (e.g. skaldskapr "poetry," also, in Icelandic law books, "libel in verse").

v.

late 14c., "be abusive or quarrelsome," from scold (n.). Related: Scolded; scolding.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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