follow Dictionary.com

Do you know ghouls from goblins and ghosts?

skulk

[skuhlk] /skʌlk/
verb (used without object)
1.
to lie or keep in hiding, as for some evil reason:
The thief skulked in the shadows.
2.
to move in a stealthy manner; slink:
The panther skulked through the bush.
3.
British. to shirk duty; malinger.
noun
4.
a person who skulks.
5.
a pack or group of foxes.
6.
Rare. an act or instance of skulking.
Also, sculk.
Origin
1175-1225
1175-1225; Middle English < Scandinavian (not in ON); compare Danish, Norwegian skulke, Swedish skolka play hooky
Related forms
skulker, noun
skulkingly, adverb
Synonyms
1. See lurk.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for skulking
  • Their sight and hearing aren't great, so it's easy to sneak up on one skulking in the underbrush.
  • Other contenders, as yet undiscovered, could well be skulking in the dripping declivities of this arboreal paradise.
  • The truth behind the circles is, alas, almost certainly more mundane: skulking humans.
  • The deer fawns are always skulking about, and are by no means such bold inquisitive little creatures as the small antelope are.
  • There is a danger that piracy will move on from teenagers skulking in bedrooms and into the living room.
  • Rivals become mere fans around her, lingering at the door of her dressing room and then skulking away.
  • The grumbling and grousing of many soldiers should not be confused with skulking.
  • When the cops see the mainlanders skulking around the crime scene, they immediately take them as suspects.
  • Tetanus is a real lowlife, skulking around the dirtiest places, waiting for the chance to infect someone.
  • It is a skulking bird of the southern canebrakes and rhododendron thickets.
British Dictionary definitions for skulking

skulk

/skʌlk/
verb (intransitive)
1.
to move stealthily so as to avoid notice
2.
to lie in hiding; lurk
3.
to shirk duty or evade responsibilities; malinger
noun
4.
a person who skulks
5.
(obsolete) a pack of foxes or other animals that creep about stealthily
Derived Forms
skulker, noun
Word Origin
C13: of Scandinavian origin; compare Norwegian skulka to lurk, Swedish skolka, Danish skulke to shirk
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for skulking

skulk

v.

c.1200, from a Scandinavian source, cf. Norwegian skulke "to shirk, malinger," Danish skulke "to spare oneself, shirk," Swedish skolka "to shirk, skulk, slink, play truant." Common in Middle English but lacking in 15c.-16c. records; possibly reborrowed 17c. Related: Skulked; skulking; skulker; skulkery.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for skulk

Some English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for skulking

17
21
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with skulking

Nearby words for skulking