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Samaritan

[suh-mar-i-tn] /səˈmær ɪ tn/
noun
1.
an inhabitant of Samaria.
3.
(often lowercase) one who is compassionate and helpful to a person in distress.
4.
any of the dialects of Aramaic spoken by the Samaritans in ancient Israel and until recently still spoken in Nablus.
adjective
5.
pertaining to Samaria or to Samaritans.
Origin
1000
before 1000; Middle English, Old English < Late Latin samarītānus < Greek samarī́t(ēs) dweller in Samaria + -ānus -an
Related forms
Samaritanism, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for samaritans

Samaritan

/səˈmærɪtən/
noun
1.
a native or inhabitant of Samaria
2.
short for Good Samaritan
3.
a member of a voluntary organization (the Samaritans) which offers counselling to people in despair, esp by telephone
4.
the dialect of Aramaic spoken in Samaria
adjective
5.
of or relating to Samaria
Derived Forms
Samaritanism, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for samaritans

Samaritan

n.

Old English, "inhabitant of Samaria," a district of Palestine, from Late Latin Samaritanus, from Greek Samareia (see Samaria). A non-Hebrew race was settled in its cities by the king of Assyria after the removal of the Israelites from the country. They later adopted some Jewish ways, but largely remained apart. Figurative use with reference to the good Samaritan is first recorded 1630s, from Luke x:33. Related: Samaritanism.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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samaritans in the Bible

the name given to the new and mixed inhabitants whom Esarhaddon (B.C. 677), the king of Assyria, brought from Babylon and other places and settled in the cities of Samaria, instead of the original inhabitants whom Sargon (B.C. 721) had removed into captivity (2 Kings 17:24; comp. Ezra 4:2, 9, 10). These strangers (comp. Luke 17:18) amalgamated with the Jews still remaining in the land, and gradually abandoned their old idolatry and adopted partly the Jewish religion. After the return from the Captivity, the Jews in Jerusalem refused to allow them to take part with them in rebuilding the temple, and hence sprang up an open enmity between them. They erected a rival temple on Mount Gerizim, which was, however, destroyed by a Jewish king (B.C. 130). They then built another at Shechem. The bitter enmity between the Jews and Samaritans continued in the time of our Lord: the Jews had "no dealings with the Samaritans" (John 4:9; comp. Luke 9:52, 53). Our Lord was in contempt called "a Samaritan" (John 8:48). Many of the Samaritans early embraced the gospel (John 4:5-42; Acts 8:25; 9:31; 15:3). Of these Samaritans there still remains a small population of about one hundred and sixty, who all reside in Shechem, where they carefully observe the religious customs of their fathers. They are the "smallest and oldest sect in the world."

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Idioms and Phrases with samaritans

Samaritan

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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