shilling

[shil-ing]
noun
1.
a cupronickel coin and former monetary unit of the United Kingdom, the 20th part of a pound, equal to 12 pence: retained in circulation equal to 5 new pence after decimalization in 1971. Abbreviation: s.
2.
a former monetary unit of various other nations, as Australia, Fiji, Ghana, Ireland, Jamaica, New Zealand, and Nigeria, equal to one twentieth of a pound or 12 pence.
3.
the monetary unit of Kenya, Somalia, Tanzania, and Uganda, equal to 100 cents.
4.
any of various coins and moneys of account used in various parts of the U.S. in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English; Old English scilling; cognate with Dutch schelling, German Schilling, Old Norse skillingr, Gothic skillings

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shilling (ˈʃɪlɪŋ)
 
n
1.  s, Abbreviation: sh a former British and Australian silver or cupronickel coin worth one twentieth of a pound: not minted in Britain since 1970
2.  the standard monetary unit of Kenya, Somalia, Tanzania, and Uganda: divided into 100 cents
3.  an old monetary unit of the US varying in value in different states
4.  (Scot) (in combination) /- an indication of the strength and character of a beer, referring to the price after duty that was formerly paid per barrel: sixty-shilling
 
[Old English scilling; related to Old Norse skillingr, Gothic skilliggs, Old High German skilling]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

shilling
O.E. scilling, a coin consisting of a varying number of pence (on the continent, a common scale was 12 pennies to a shilling, 20 shillings to a pound), from P.Gmc. *skillingoz- (cf. O.S., Dan., Swed., O.Fris., O.H.G. skilling, O.N. skillingr, Du. schelling, Ger. Schilling, Goth. skilliggs), which some
etymologists trace to the base *skell- "to resound, to ring," and others to the base *skel- "to split, to divide" (perhaps via sense of "shield;" see shield). The ending may represent the dim. suffix -ling. O.C.S. skulezi, Sp. escalin, Fr. schelling, It. scellino are Gmc. loan-words.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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