subculture

[v. suhb-kuhl-cher; n. suhb-kuhl-cher]
verb (used with object), subcultured, subculturing.
1.
Bacteriology. to cultivate (a bacterial strain) again on a new medium.
noun
2.
Bacteriology. a culture derived in this manner.
3.
Sociology.
a.
the cultural values and behavioral patterns distinctive of a particular group in a society.
b.
a group having social, economic, ethnic, or other traits distinctive enough to distinguish it from others within the same culture or society.

Origin:
1895–1900; sub- + culture

subcultural, adjective
subculturally, adverb
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
subculture
 
n
1.  a subdivision of a national culture or an enclave within it with a distinct integrated network of behaviour, beliefs, and attitudes
2.  a culture of microorganisms derived from another culture
 
vb
3.  (tr) to inoculate (bacteria from one culture medium) onto another medium
 
sub'cultural
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

subculture
1886, in ref. to bacterial cultures, from sub- + culture. 1936 in ref. to humans.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

subculture sub·cul·ture (sŭb'kŭl'chər)
n.
A culture made by transferring to a fresh medium microorganisms from a previous culture.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

subculture definition


A group within a society that has its own shared set of customs, attitudes, and values, often accompanied by jargon or slang. A subculture can be organized around a common activity, occupation, age, status, ethnic background, race, religion, or any other unifying social condition, but the term is often used to describe deviant groups, such as thieves and drug users. (See counterculture.)

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
Nor do they rise, or sink, to the level of a subculture.
And yet a whole subculture is still stuck at that first morning.
Paradoxically, although their long-term prospects look wobbly, the messenger
  subculture has never been stronger.
Its typical for media groups to usually go straight for the negative aspects of
  any subculture.
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