substantial

[suhb-stan-shuhl]
adjective
1.
of ample or considerable amount, quantity, size, etc.: a substantial sum of money.
2.
of a corporeal or material nature; tangible; real.
3.
of solid character or quality; firm, stout, or strong: a substantial physique.
4.
basic or essential; fundamental: two stories in substantial agreement.
5.
wealthy or influential: one of the substantial men of the town.
6.
of real worth, value, or effect: substantial reasons.
7.
pertaining to the substance, matter, or material of a thing.
8.
of or pertaining to the essence of a thing; essential, material, or important.
9.
being a substance; having independent existence.
10.
Philosophy. pertaining to or of the nature of substance rather than an accident or attribute.
noun
11.
something substantial.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English substancial < Late Latin substantiālis, equivalent to Latin substanti(a) substance + -ālis -al1

substantiality, substantialness, noun
substantially, adverb
nonsubstantial, adjective
nonsubstantially, adverb
nonsubstantialness, noun
nonsubstantiality, noun
presubstantial, adjective
supersubstantial, adjective
supersubstantially, adverb


3. stable, sound. 6. valid, important.


2. immaterial, ethereal.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To Substantially
Collins
World English Dictionary
substantial (səbˈstænʃəl)
 
adj
1.  of a considerable size or value: substantial funds
2.  worthwhile; important: a substantial reform
3.  having wealth or importance
4.  (of food or a meal) sufficient and nourishing
5.  solid or strong in construction, quality, or character: a substantial door
6.  real; actual; true: the evidence is substantial
7.  of or relating to the basic or fundamental substance or aspects of a thing
8.  philosophy of or relating to substance rather than to attributes, accidents, or modifications
 
substantiality
 
n
 
sub'stantialness
 
n
 
sub'stantially
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

substantial
mid-14c., "ample, sizeable," from O.Fr. substantiel (13c.), from L. substantialis "having substance or reality, material," from substantia (see substance). Meaning "existing, having real existence" is from late 14c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
For movies with a large number of ratings, you do substantially well.
The best shelter is a large, substantially constructed building with intact, well-grounded wiring and plumbing.
Humans have caused global precipitation patterns to change substantially over
  the past century, new research says.
Graduation ceremonies vary quite substantially around the world but they tend
  to have this same underlying diagram.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature