suckling

suckling

[suhk-ling]
noun
an infant or a young animal that is not yet weaned.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English; see suck, -ling1

Dictionary.com Unabridged

Suckling

[suhk-ling]
noun
Sir John, 1609–42, English poet.

suckle

[suhk-uhl]
verb (used with object), suckled, suckling.
1.
to nurse at the breast or udder.
2.
to nourish or bring up.
3.
to put to suck.
verb (used without object), suckled, suckling.
4.
to suck at the breast or udder.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English sucklen; see suck, -le

unsuckled, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
suckle (ˈsʌkəl)
 
vb
1.  to give (a baby or young animal) milk from the breast or (of a baby, etc) to suck milk from the breast
2.  (tr) to bring up; nurture
 
[C15: probably back formation from suckling]
 
'suckler
 
n

suckling (ˈsʌklɪŋ)
 
n
1.  an infant or young animal that is still taking milk from the mother
2.  a very young child
 
[C15: see suck, -ling1; related to Middle Dutch sūgeling, Middle High German sōgelinc]

Suckling (ˈsʌklɪŋ)
 
n
Sir John. 1609--42, English Cavalier poet and dramatist

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

suckle
1408, perhaps a causative form of M.E. suken "to suck" (see suck), or a back-formation from suckling (though this word is attested only from c.1440).

suckling
c.1440, "an infant at the breast," from suck + dim. suffix -ling. Cf. M.Du. sogeling, Du. zuigeling, Ger. Säugling. Meaning "act of breast-feeding" is attested from 1799.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Synonyms
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