sustain

[suh-steyn]
verb (used with object)
1.
to support, hold, or bear up from below; bear the weight of, as a structure.
2.
to bear (a burden, charge, etc.).
3.
to undergo, experience, or suffer (injury, loss, etc.); endure without giving way or yielding.
4.
to keep (a person, the mind, the spirits, etc.) from giving way, as under trial or affliction.
5.
to keep up or keep going, as an action or process: to sustain a conversation.
6.
to supply with food, drink, and other necessities of life.
7.
to provide for (an institution or the like) by furnishing means or funds.
8.
to support (a cause or the like) by aid or approval.
9.
to uphold as valid, just, or correct, as a claim or the person making it: The judge sustained the lawyer's objection.
10.
to confirm or corroborate, as a statement: Further investigation sustained my suspicions.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English suste(i)nen < Anglo-French sustenir, Old French < Latin sustinēre to uphold, equivalent to sus- sus- + -tinēre, combining form of tenēre to hold

sustainable, adjective
sustainedly [suh-stey-nid-lee, -steynd-] , adverb
sustainingly, adverb
sustainment, noun
nonsustained, adjective
nonsustaining, adjective
presustained, adjective
unsustained, adjective
unsustaining, adjective
well-sustained, adjective


1. carry. See support. 3. bear. 5. maintain.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
sustain (səˈsteɪn)
 
vb
1.  to hold up under; withstand: to sustain great provocation
2.  to undergo (an injury, loss, etc); suffer: to sustain a broken arm
3.  to maintain or prolong: to sustain a discussion
4.  to support physically from below
5.  to provide for or give support to, esp by supplying necessities: to sustain one's family; to sustain a charity
6.  to keep up the vitality or courage of
7.  to uphold or affirm the justice or validity of: to sustain a decision
8.  to establish the truth of; confirm
 
n
9.  music the prolongation of a note, by playing technique or electronics
 
[C13: via Old French from Latin sustinēre to hold up, from sub- + tenēre to hold]
 
sus'tained
 
adj
 
sustainedly
 
adv
 
sus'taining
 
adj
 
sus'tainingly
 
adv
 
sus'tainment
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

sustain
late 13c., from O.Fr. sustenir "hold up, endure," from L. sustinere "hold up, support, endure," from sub "up from below" + tenere "to hold" (see tenet).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
He was a moralist who did not parade his moral, but who used it as the
  sustaining skeleton of his narrative.
Responsible for developing and sustaining relationships within the college and
  the community at large.
If meetings are often frustrating, they are also an indispensable part of
  sustaining any organization of even moderate complexity.
Cherry picking programs in demand will always provide better results than
  sustaining a broad set of courses and degrees.
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