symphony

[sim-fuh-nee]
noun, plural symphonies.
1.
Music.
a.
an elaborate instrumental composition in three or more movements, similar in form to a sonata but written for an orchestra and usually of far grander proportions and more varied elements.
b.
an instrumental passage occurring in a vocal composition, or between vocal movements in a composition.
c.
an instrumental piece, often in several movements, forming the overture to an opera or the like.
3.
a concert performed by a symphony orchestra.
4.
anything characterized by a harmonious combination of elements, especially an effective combination of colors.
5.
harmony of sounds.
6.
Archaic. agreement; concord.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English symfonye < Old French symphonie < Latin symphōnia concert < Greek symphōnía harmony. See sym-, -phony

presymphony, noun, plural presymphonies.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
symphony (ˈsɪmfənɪ)
 
n , pl -nies
1.  an extended large-scale orchestral composition, usually with several movements, at least one of which is in sonata form. The classical form of the symphony was fixed by Haydn and Mozart, but the innovations of subsequent composers have freed it entirely from classical constraints. It continues to be a vehicle for serious, large-scale orchestral music
2.  a piece of instrumental music in up to three very short movements, used as an overture to or interlude in a baroque opera
3.  any purely orchestral movement in a vocal work, such as a cantata or oratorio
4.  short for symphony orchestra
5.  in musical theory, esp of classical Greece
 a.  another word for consonance Compare diaphony
 b.  the interval of unison
6.  anything distinguished by a harmonious composition: the picture was a symphony of green
7.  archaic harmony in general; concord
 
[C13: from Old French symphonie, from Latin symphōnia concord, concert, from Greek sumphōnia, from syn- + phōnē sound]
 
symphonic
 
adj
 
sym'phonically
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

symphony
late 13c., the name of various musical instruments, from O.Fr. symphonie "harmony" (12c.), from L. symphonia "a unison of sounds, harmony," from Gk. symphonia "harmony, concert," from symphonos "harmonious," from syn- "together" + phone "voice, sound" (see fame). Meaning "harmony
of sounds" is attested from mid-15c.; sense of "music in parts" is from 1590s. "It was only after the advent of Haydn that this word began to mean a sonata for full orchestra. Before that time it meant a prelude, postlude, or interlude, or any short instrumental work." ["Elson's Music Dictionary"] Meaning "elaborate orchestral composition" first attested 1789 (symphonic in this sense is from 1864). Elliptical for "symphony orchestra" from 1926.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

symphony definition


An extended musical composition for orchestra in several movements, typically four. Among the composers especially known for their symphonies are Ludwig van Beethoven, Johannes Brahms, Franz Josef Haydn, Gustav Mahler, and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

Symphony definition

tool, product
Lotus Development's successor to their Lotus 1-2-3 spreadsheet. Unlike 1-2-3, Symphony allowed a limited form of multitasking. The user could switch manually between it and MS-DOS and separate graph and spreadsheet windows could be opened simultaneously and would be updated automatically when cells were changed. In addition, a small word processor could be opened in a third window. These all could be printed out on the same report. Symphony could read and write Lotus 1-2-3 files and had interactive graphical output and a word processor, thus making it effectively a report generator. Unlike 1-2-3, Symphony was not a great commercial success.
(1995-03-28)
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Example sentences
It is particularly strong in music, with chamber and symphony orchestras, a
  jazz band and an excellent choir.
Combines scholarly and personal perspectives in a study of the composer's final
  symphony.
The city hosts a number of annual festivals and has its own ballet and symphony.
When travel sends you thunderstorms, enjoy the symphony.
Image for Symphony
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