Synecdoches

synecdoche

[si-nek-duh-kee]
noun Rhetoric.
a figure of speech in which a part is used for the whole or the whole for a part, the special for the general or the general for the special, as in ten sail for ten ships or a Croesus for a rich man.

Origin:
1350–1400; < Medieval Latin < Greek synekdochḗ, equivalent to syn- syn- + ekdochḗ act of receiving from another, equivalent to ek- ec- + -dochē, noun derivative of déchesthai to receive

synecdochic [sin-ik-dok-ik] , synecdochical, adjective
synecdochically, adverb

Schenectady, synecdoche.
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World English Dictionary
synecdoche (sɪnˈɛkdəkɪ)
 
n
a figure of speech in which a part is substituted for a whole or a whole for a part, as in 50 head of cattle for 50 cows, or the army for a soldier
 
[C14: via Latin from Greek sunekdokhē, from syn- + ekdokhē interpretation, from dekhesthai to accept]
 
synecdochic
 
adj
 
synec'dochical
 
adj
 
synec'dochically
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

synecdoche
1388, "part for whole or vice versa," from M.L. synodoche, from L.L. synecdoche, from Gk. synekdokhe, lit. "a receiving together or jointly," from synekdekhesthai "supply a thought or word, take with something else," from syn- "with" + ek "out" + dekhesthai "to receive," related to dokein "seem good"
(see decent). Figure in which an attribute or adjunct is substituted for the thing meant ("head" for "cattle," etc.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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