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7 Essential Words of Fall

tolerate

[tol-uh-reyt] /ˈtɒl əˌreɪt/
verb (used with object), tolerated, tolerating.
1.
to allow the existence, presence, practice, or act of without prohibition or hindrance; permit.
2.
to endure without repugnance; put up with:
I can tolerate laziness, but not incompetence.
3.
Medicine/Medical. to endure or resist the action of (a drug, poison, etc.).
4.
Obsolete. to experience, undergo, or sustain, as pain or hardship.
Origin
1525-1535
1525-35; < Latin tolerātus, past participle of tolerāre to bear (akin to thole2); see -ate1
Related forms
tolerative, adjective
tolerator, noun
nontolerated, adjective
nontolerative, adjective
untolerated, adjective
untolerating, adjective
untolerative, adjective
Synonyms
2. support, accept.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for tolerated
  • Further, it was different that in one nation one could go places where their religion was tolerated.
  • Local townspeople tolerated his presence because they liked to buy the goods he stole, such as cloth and sugar.
  • But chaos could not be tolerated for long, not when big money was to be made on public lands.
  • They tolerated our often-noisy kids at the rooftop pool and were always unfailingly polite.
  • Because of their different personalities, the dogs never got along wonderfully, but they tolerated each other.
  • High-maintenance and easy to rig, early slot machines were barely tolerated by casinos.
  • Once you listen to them, you'll wonder how your ears tolerated anything else.
  • Therefore, blatant license violation cannot be tolerated at any rate.
  • Trade unions were still either totally illegal or barely tolerated.
  • Your chosen managers will be winners, in which case you won't be tolerated for long.
British Dictionary definitions for tolerated

tolerate

/ˈtɒləˌreɪt/
verb (transitive)
1.
to treat with indulgence, liberality, or forbearance
2.
to permit
3.
to be able to bear; put up with
4.
(med) to have tolerance for (a drug, poison, etc)
Derived Forms
tolerative, adjective
tolerator, noun
Word Origin
C16: from Latin tolerāre sustain; related to thole²
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for tolerated

tolerate

v.

1530s, from Latin toleratus, past participle of tolerare (see toleration). Related: Tolerated; tolerating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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tolerated in Medicine

tolerate tol·er·ate (tŏl'ə-rāt')
v. tol·er·at·ed, tol·er·at·ing, tol·er·ates

  1. To allow without prohibiting or opposing; permit.

  2. To put up with; endure.

  3. To have tolerance for a substance or pathogen.


tol'er·a'tive adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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