torrent

[tawr-uhnt, tor-]
noun
1.
a stream of water flowing with great rapidity and violence.
2.
a rushing, violent, or abundant and unceasing stream of anything: a torrent of lava.
3.
a violent downpour of rain.
4.
a violent, tumultuous, or overwhelming flow: a torrent of abuse.
adjective

Origin:
1595–1605; < Latin torrent- (stem of torrēns) seething, literally, burning, present participle of torrēre to burn, parch; see torrid, -ent


4. outburst, deluge, flood, spate.
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World English Dictionary
torrent (ˈtɒrənt)
 
n
1.  a fast, voluminous, or violent stream of water or other liquid
2.  an overwhelming flow of thoughts, words, sound, etc
 
adj
3.  rare like or relating to a torrent
 
[C17: from French, from Latin torrēns (noun), from torrēns (adjective) burning, from torrēre to burn]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

torrent
c.1600, from Fr. torrent, from L. torrentem (nom. torrens) "rushing stream," originally "roaring, boiling, burning, parching," prp. of torrere "to parch" (see terrain). Sense of "any onrush" (of words, feelings, etc.) first recorded 1640s. Torrential first attested 1849.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
With distance, the torrents of wild scandal increase in volume and volubility.
For centuries, such rivalries led to torrents of blood.
With torrents it became literally impossible to make money on selling
  standalone applications to consumers.
Torrents of e-mail have turned us all into file clerks.
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