un-distantly

distant

[dis-tuhnt]
adjective
1.
far off or apart in space; not near at hand; remote or removed (often followed by from ): a distant place; a town three miles distant from here.
2.
apart or far off in time: distant centuries past.
3.
remote or far apart in any respect: a distant relative.
4.
reserved or aloof; not familiar or cordial: a distant greeting.
5.
arriving from or going to a distance, as a communication, journey, etc.: I have here a distant letter from Japan.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English dista(u)nt (< Anglo-French) < Latin distant- (stem of distāns, present participle of distāre to stand apart), equivalent to di- di-2 + stā- stand + -nt- present participle suffix

distantly, adverb
distantness, noun
overdistant, adjective
overdistantly, adverb
quasi-distant, adjective
quasi-distantly, adverb
ultradistant, adjective
undistant, adjective
undistantly, adverb


4. cool, withdrawn.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
distant (ˈdɪstənt)
 
adj
1.  far away or apart in space or time
2.  (postpositive) separated in space or time by a specified distance
3.  apart in relevance, association, or relationship: a distant cousin
4.  coming from or going to a faraway place: a distant journey
5.  remote in manner; aloof
6.  abstracted; absent: a distant look
 
[C14: from Latin distāre to be distant, from dis-1 + stāre to stand]
 
'distantly
 
adv
 
'distantness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

distant
late 14c., from Fr. distant (14c.), from L. distantem, prp. of distare (see distance).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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