waiver

[wey-ver]
noun Law.
1.
an intentional relinquishment of some right, interest, or the like.
2.
an express or written statement of such relinquishment.

Origin:
1620–30; < Anglo-French weyver, noun use of weyver to waive; see -er3

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To WAIVER
Collins
World English Dictionary
waiver (ˈweɪvə)
 
n
1.  the voluntary relinquishment, expressly or by implication, of some claim or right
2.  the act or an instance of relinquishing a claim or right
3.  a formal statement in writing of such relinquishment
 
[C17: from Old Northern French weyver to relinquish, waive]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Example sentences
The commission noted there is no guarantee other companies in the future will
  agree to such a waiver.
It's a popular car, which explains why it wouldn't get a waiver to be imported
  as a rare vehicle.
Call to request a waiver of the late penalty if you mostly pay on time but
  accidentally miss a deadline one month.
There is no evidence borrowers as a whole wanted a loan waiver.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature