waitering

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waiter

[wey-ter]
noun
1.
a person, especially a man, who waits on tables, as in a restaurant.
2.
a tray for carrying dishes, a tea service, etc.; salver.
3.
a person who waits or awaits.
4.
Obsolete. an attendant.
verb (used without object)
5.
to work or serve as a waiter: to waiter in a restaurant.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English; see wait, -er1

waiterless, adjective


See -person.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
waiter (ˈweɪtə)
 
n
1.  a man whose occupation is to serve at table, as in a restaurant
2.  an attendant at the London Stock Exchange or Lloyd's who carries messages: the modern equivalent of waiters who performed these duties in the 17th-century London coffee houses in which these institutions originated
3.  a person who waits
4.  a tray or salver on which dishes, etc, are carried

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

waiter
late 14c., "attendant, watchman," agent noun from wait (v.). Sense of "servant who waits at tables" is from late 15c., originally in reference to household servants; in reference to inns, eating houses, etc., it is attested from 1660s. Fem. form waitress first recorded 1834.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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