Walton

Walton

[wawl-tn]
noun
1.
Ernest Thomas Sinton [sin-tn] , 1903–95, Irish physicist: Nobel prize 1951.
2.
Izaak [ahy-zuhk] , 1593–1683, English writer.
3.
Samuel Moore ("Sam") 1918–92, U.S. business executive and founder of Wal-Mart Stores.
4.
Sir William (Turner) 1902–83, English composer.

Waltonian [wawl-toh-nee-uhn] , noun, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
Walton (ˈwɔːltən)
 
n
1.  Ernest Thomas Sinton. 1903--95, Irish physicist. He succeeded in producing the first artificial transmutation of an atomic nucleus (1932) with Sir John Cockcroft, with whom he shared the Nobel prize for physics 1951
2.  Izaak (ˈaɪzək). 1593--1683, English writer, best known for The Compleat Angler (1653; enlarged 1676)
3.  Sir William (Turner). 1902--83, English composer. His works include Façade (1923), a setting of satirical verses by Edith Sitwell, the Viola Concerto (1929), and the oratorio Belshazzar's Feast (1931)

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
Walton   (wôl'tən)  Pronunciation Key 
Irish physicist who, with John Cockcroft, was the first to successfully split an atom using a particle accelerator in 1932. For this work they shared the 1951 Nobel Prize for physics.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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"I can just remember an old brown-coated man who was the Walton of this stream, who had come over from Newcastle, England, with his son,—the latter a stout and hearty man who had lifted an anchor in his day. A straight old man he was, who took his way in silence through the meadows, having passed the period of communication with his fellows; his old experienced coat, hanging long and straight and brown as the yellow pine bark, glittering with so much smothered sunlight, if you stood near enough, no work of art but naturalized at length. I often discovered him unexpectedly amid the pads and the gray willows when he moved, fishing in some old country method,—for youth and age then went a-fishing together,—full of incommunicable thoughts, perchance about his own Tyne and Northumberland. He was always to be seen in serene afternoons haunting the river, and almost rustling with the sedge; so many sunny hours in an old man's life, entrapping silly fish; almost grown to be the sun's familiar; what need had he of hat or raiment any, having served out his time, and seen through such thin disguises? I have seen how his coeval fates rewarded him with the yellow perch, and yet I thought his luck was not in proportion to his years; and I have seen when, with slow steps and weighed down with aged thoughts, he disappeared with his fish under his low-roofed house on the skirts of the village. I think nobody else saw him; nobody else remembers him now, for he soon after died, and migrated to new Tyne streams. His fishing was not a sport, nor solely a means of subsistence, but a sort of solemn sacrament and withdrawal from the world, just as the aged read their Bibles."
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