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Carrel

[kuh-rel, kar-uh l; French ka-rel] /kəˈrɛl, ˈkær əl; French kaˈrɛl/
noun
1.
Alexis
[uh-lek-sis;; French a-lek-see] /əˈlɛk sɪs;; French a lɛkˈsi/ (Show IPA),
1873–1944, French surgeon and biologist, in U.S. 1905–39: Nobel Prize 1912.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for a carrel

carrel

/ˈkærəl/
noun
1.
a small individual study room or private desk, often in a library, where a student or researcher can work undisturbed
Word Origin
C16: a variant of carol

Carrel

/kəˈrɛl; ˈkærəl; French karɛl/
noun
1.
Alexis (əˈlɛksɪs; French alɛksi). 1873–1944, French surgeon and biologist, active in the US (1905–39): developed a method of suturing blood vessels, making the transplantation of arteries and organs possible: Nobel prize for physiology or medicine 1912
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for a carrel

carrel

n.

1590s, "study in a cloister," from Medieval Latin carula "small study in a cloister," of unknown origin; perhaps from Latin corolla "little crown, garland," used in various senses of "ring" (e.g. of Stonehenge: "þis Bretons renged about þe feld, þe karole of þe stones beheld," 1330); extended to precincts and spaces enclosed by rails, etc. Specific sense of "private cubicle in a library" is from 1919.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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a carrel in Medicine

Carrel Car·rel (kə-rěl', kār'əl), Alexis. 1873-1944.

French-born American surgeon and biologist. He won a 1912 Nobel Prize for his work on vascular ligature and grafting of blood vessels and organs.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Article for a carrel

carrel

cubicle or study for reading and literary work; the word is derived from the Middle English carole, "round dance," or "carol." The term originally referred to carrels in the north cloister walk of a Benedictine monastery and today designates study cubicles in libraries. Carrels are first recorded in the 13th century at Westminster Abbey, London, though they probably existed from the late years of the 12th century.

Learn more about carrel with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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