abdicate

[ab-di-keyt]
verb (used without object), abdicated, abdicating.
1.
to renounce or relinquish a throne, right, power, claim, responsibility, or the like, especially in a formal manner: The aging founder of the firm decided to abdicate.
verb (used with object), abdicated, abdicating.
2.
to give up or renounce (authority, duties, an office, etc.), especially in a voluntary, public, or formal manner: King Edward VIII of England abdicated the throne in 1936.

Origin:
1535–45; < Latin abdicātus renounced (past participle of abdicāre), equivalent to ab- ab- + dicātus proclaimed (dic- (see dictum) + -ātus -ate1)

abdicable [ab-di-kuh-buhl] , adjective
abdicative [ab-di-key-tiv, -kuh-] , adjective
abdicator, noun
nonabdicative, adjective
unabdicated, adjective
unabdicating, adjective
unabdicative, adjective

abdicate, abrogate, arrogate, derogate.


1. resign, quit. 2. abandon, repudiate.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
abdicate (ˈæbdɪˌkeɪt)
 
vb
to renounce (a throne, power, responsibility, rights, etc), esp formally
 
[C16: from the past participle of Latin abdicāre to proclaim away, disclaim]
 
abdicable
 
adj
 
abdi'cation
 
n
 
abdicative
 
adj
 
'abdicator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

abdicate
1540s, "to disown, disinherit (children)," from L. abdicatus, pp. of abdicare "to renounce, disown, disinherit" (specifically abdicare magistratu "renounce office"), from ab- "away" + dicare "proclaim," from stem of dicere "to speak, to say" (see diction). Meaning "divest
oneself of office" first recorded 1610s. Related: Abdicated; abdicating.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
He accused the city government of having abdicated its responsibility to enforce the law at the market.
If bad decisions are being made, then it's because politicians have abdicated their responsibilities as well as their conscience.
Instead, last month, the justices abdicated their legal and moral duty and declined to review the case.
The state has abdicated to local building officials what structures need a structural engineer.
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