abhor

[ab-hawr]
verb (used with object), abhorred, abhorring.
to regard with extreme repugnance or aversion; detest utterly; loathe; abominate.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English < Latin abhorrēre to shrink back from, shudder at, equivalent to ab- ab- + horrēre to bristle, tremble

abhorrer, noun
superabhor, verb (used with object), superabhorred, superabhorring.
unabhorred, adjective


despise. See hate.


love, admire.
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World English Dictionary
abhor (əbˈhɔː)
 
vb , -hors, -horring, -horred
(tr) to detest vehemently; find repugnant; reject
 
[C15: from Latin abhorrēre to shudder at, shrink from, from ab- away from + horrēre to bristle, shudder]
 
ab'horrer
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

abhor
mid-15c., from L. abhorrere "shrink back in terror," from ab- "away" + horrere "tremble at, shudder," lit. "to bristle, be shaggy," from PIE *ghers- "start out, stand out, rise to a point, bristle" (see horror).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Nature abhors the old, and old age seems the only disease: all others run into
  this one.
Also from observation the natural world abhors the limit.
The brother abhors all perversity, while he suffers from compulsive impulses.
In life as in thermodynamics, nature abhors a vacuum.
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