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[uh-bahyd] /əˈbaɪd/
verb (used without object), abode or abided, abiding.
to remain; continue; stay:
Abide with me.
to have one's abode; dwell; reside:
to abide in a small Scottish village.
to continue in a particular condition, attitude, relationship, etc.; last.
verb (used with object), abode or abided, abiding.
to put up with; tolerate; stand:
I can't abide dishonesty!
to endure, sustain, or withstand without yielding or submitting:
to abide a vigorous onslaught.
to wait for; await:
to abide the coming of the Lord.
to accept without opposition or question:
to abide the verdict of the judges.
to pay the price or penalty of; suffer for.
Verb phrases
abide by,
  1. to act in accord with.
  2. to submit to; agree to:
    to abide by the court's decision.
  3. to remain steadfast or faithful to; keep:
    If you make a promise, abide by it.
Origin of abide
before 1000; Middle English abiden, Old English ābīdan; cognate with Old High German irbītan await, Gothic usbeisns expectation, patience. See a-3, bide
Related forms
abider, noun
1. tarry. 2. live. 3. persevere, endure. 4. bear, endure, brook; support. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for abide
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • "I never could abide the looks of him," said Samantha, peering over Miss Vilda's shoulder.

    Timothy's Quest Kate Douglas Wiggin
  • The officers then could not abide him, though some were submissive to him because of his father's position.

    In the Valley Harold Frederic
  • It is simply to proceed as we have begun, and to abide by our declared principles.

  • Though the desert were arid on this side, it was her desert, and there in her tent must she abide.

    Tiverton Tales Alice Brown
  • But we've told you that we're willing to abide by what the experts say.

    Accidental Flight Floyd L. Wallace
British Dictionary definitions for abide


verb abides, abiding, abode, abided
(transitive) to tolerate; put up with
(transitive) to accept or submit to; suffer: to abide the court's decision
(intransitive) foll by by
  1. to comply (with): to abide by the decision
  2. to remain faithful (to): to abide by your promise
(intransitive) to remain or continue
(intransitive) (archaic) to dwell
(transitive) (archaic) to await in expectation
(transitive) (archaic) to withstand or sustain; endure: to abide the onslaught
Derived Forms
abidance, noun
abider, noun
Word Origin
Old English ābīdan, from a- (intensive) + bīdan to wait, bide
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for abide

Old English abidan, gebidan "remain, wait, delay, remain behind," from ge- completive prefix (denoting onward motion; see a- (1)) + bidan "bide, remain, wait, dwell" (see bide). Originally intransitive (with genitive of the object: we abidon his "we waited for him"); transitive sense emerged in Middle English. Meaning "to put up with" (now usually negative) first recorded 1520s. Related: Abided; abiding. The historical conjugation is abide, abode, abidden, but the modern formation is now generally weak.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Idioms and Phrases with abide


In addition to the idioms beginning with abide abide by also see: can't stand (abide)
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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