abjectness

abject

[ab-jekt, ab-jekt]
adjective
1.
utterly hopeless, miserable, humiliating, or wretched: abject poverty.
2.
contemptible; despicable; base-spirited: an abject coward.
3.
shamelessly servile; slavish.
4.
Obsolete. cast aside.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English < Latin abjectus thrown down (past participle of abicere, abjicere), equivalent to ab- ab + -jec- throw + -tus past participle suffix

abjectly, adverb
abjectness, abjectedness, noun
unabject, adjective
unabjectly, adverb
unabjectness, noun

abject, object.


1. debasing, degrading; miserable. 2. base, mean, low, vile.


exalted.
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World English Dictionary
abject (ˈæbdʒɛkt)
 
adj
1.  utterly wretched or hopeless
2.  miserable; forlorn; dejected
3.  indicating humiliation; submissive: an abject apology
4.  contemptible; despicable; servile: an abject liar
 
[C14: (in the sense: rejected, cast out): from Latin abjectus thrown or cast away, from abjicere, from ab- away + jacere to throw]
 
ab'jection
 
n
 
'abjectly
 
adv
 
'abjectness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin & History

abject
early 15c., "cast off, rejected," from L. abjectus, pp. of abicere "throw away, cast off," from ab- "away, off" + jacere "to throw" (pp. jactus; see jet (v.)). Fig. sense of "downcast, brought low" first attested 1510s. Related: Abjectly.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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